Upgraded back To Windows 10. Same Slow Boot Issue


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Hi guys, a month back I rolled back to Win 7 due to some issues mainly slow boot. I upgraded back today and the issue still remains. I have tried many of the fixes given online but with little success. In BIOS settings, i enabled legacy boot only, after which I observed that the black screen stayed for only 45 seconds compared to the earlier 1 minute, but the loading time to desktop from login screen was the same i.e. 1 minute. Compared to this Windows 7 loaded to desktop from OEM logo in just a minute. What exactly happens in between the windows logo, the black screen, the login screen and then to desktop? I understand that a clean install may fix it, but until i do that, i wish to explore other options to try and find out what makes it boot slow to this extent.
 
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I don't have an answer for what is going on under the covers during black screens, etc, Someone else may have insight to that. What I can offer is some anecdotal evidence in that - after having upgraded from W7 to W10 - I was having the exact same experience as you with long black screens, slow boot up (and a host of other startup and shutdown problems). A clean install corrected all of the problems I was experiencing. No more black screens, boot time to login screen to desktop now less than 45 seconds, probably less than that most of time. No more start up or shutdown issues. It was well worth the few hours it took to do the clean install, reinstall my most important 3rd party programs, and copy back my documents from an external drive. Just wanted to share. Your mileage may vary.
 
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Thanks! Although if I do a clean install, will I lose the contents in my data drive or just the windows drive? Also If i do a reset having availed the in place upgrade, will I need installation media?
 
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I can only attest to my clean install experience. After moving my important documents to a reliable external hard drive (and the making a copy of that folder and placing it on yet another external drive), and AFTER TAKING A COMPLETE VERIFIED SYSTEM IMAGE with Macrium Reflect (and making sure my media recovery USB was functioning), I did the install using the MS Media Creation Tool. During the initial steps it will want you to select which partition to install the OS to. I chose to follow some advice of others who have treaded a clean install before and I deleted all available partitions. This will smoke all your data, thus the backups and system image prior to the installation attempt.

I have not yet done a reset, but from my understanding, external installation media other than what is part of the current W10 install is not needed. However, you'd want others here to confirm that.

Good luck!
 
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Thanks! So this means I WILL be able to keep my other partitions and format only the c drive. I do not see any reason for formatting other partitions during a clean install. Although that is just my opinion. My PC is fairly new, I do not have much data stored on my 1tb hdd. Also I do not have access to an external hdd. So I think I shall only format the c drive and go ahead with the clean install.
 
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I suspect you have a changed condition that windows 10 detects from boot to boot in the bios.

My Motherboard is 2-3 years old and is of the northbridge type.
I found that changing the NB frequency from Auto to Manual and setting it to 20
(it will adjust it to the maximum frequency possible on my gigybyte Motherboard gives me
a boot time from pressing the button to seeing the desktop in less than 45 seconds or so

Having to type the password i booted in less than 60 seconds.

I have since then changed it to automatic log on but have not recorded the boot time.
You should boot 2 times after a shutdown, yes a shutdown not a restart to verify.

I think what is happening is that Windows 10 is handeling shut downs very differently than
windows 7. Its sort a like a pseudo hibernation but not quite. Once it detects changes to the
system or thinks that there has been changes it will do a Full boot where it reconfigures
settings to give you optimum OS performance. kind a like a mobious loop.

You should try and take all auto settings in your bios and set them to manual without actually
altering them, let them be at their default.

In the case of my Northbridge Frequency setting it to 8 or below gave me slow boots and lots
of activity on HD and an actual maximum Northbridge Frequency of maximum 7.20 * 100(base cpu clock) = 720 mhz as viewed in HWINFO64. It can throttle up and down in real time like the CPU.

I then set it to 20 and the Northbridge Frequency was still 7.20 * 100 (base cpu clock) = 720 mhz at maximum but boy did it have an impact on boot times. Not the first time though, but the 2nd after that was this 45 second fast from pressing the on button.

hope this helps.
 

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