SOLVED Change from 32 bit to 64 bit win 10


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Hi and thanks in advance for any help you can give me. I'm about to change my win 10 from 32 bit to 64 and know I should check my drivers for my hardware to find new ones which will work with 64 bits. But I don't know where to begin or end. I supose I must check the screen, the printer, the mouse, the CD player, but what else do I need to check? And how do I do this?

Thanks for any advice you can give me.

normans
 
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Changing from x86/32-bit to x64/64-bit or the other way around requires a clean install and the same for the drivers. The monitor and mouse aren't an issue, work with either. The ODD/Optical Disk Drive works with either for the basics like in File Explorer. As for other things, Win10 does pretty good in installing onboard devices if connected to the Internet. Did the computer or motherboard come with a disc besides Windows? Printer will need new drivers, best from the maker of it for an MFP to get full functions..
 
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he first should verify that his system is 64 bit (x64) since x64 can fun a x86 OS while a x86 can not run a x64.
 
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64 bit is really good heaps more ram at ones disposal the only drawback is some old software won't install on to 64 bit however I manages to get some old upgrade software working by coping 32bit directories into 64 bit then using those files to install upgrades but unable to install the original software in the directory properly. and 64 bit windows will seek 64 bit software. I have a number of programs that are over 20yo used to run on win 98 and its so good not having to upgrade and then have to learn how to use new software to replace the old.
 
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64 bit is really good heaps more ram at ones disposal the only drawback is some old software won't install on to 64 bit however I manages to get some old upgrade software working by coping 32bit directories into 64 bit then using those files to install upgrades but unable to install the original software in the directory properly. and 64 bit windows will seek 64 bit software. I have a number of programs that are over 20yo used to run on win 98 and its so good not having to upgrade and then have to learn how to use new software to replace the old.
Also the 21h1 win 10 may have issues with the backup that might need fixing mine was due to replacing a drive but it should not have been an issue. Also use defender virus protection on all drives as some viruses have been sent as downloads and others as notifications.
 
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I installed 64bit W10 on an old x86 laptop after reading how on the www. Apparently laptop was masquerading as 32bit machine. Worth checking.
 
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I bought a Toshiba Laptop back in 2008 for my wife. It came with 32bit Vista and was slow as hell. I always just assumed it was 32bit but when I decided to get the old girl (the laptop not my wife) back up and running, I did a little research and found that the laptop was a duo core and could run a 64bit OS. I now run a 64bit OS (not windows) and it is somewhat faster now, not a lot faster but somewhat faster.

edit: I'm not entirely sure why I posted this as it really has nothing to do with the OP's original question. My sincere apologies.
 
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what os you running as I can't run win 11 an alternate might be an option for the puter I'm building as it won't do win 11 either.
 
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One thing is there is no 32-bit/x86 version of Win11 for new installing although it still runs x86 programs just fine like Win10 does, still has the Program Files (x86) folder for those programs. It's been some time since 32-bit-only computers have been available. The even older 16-bit programs don't usually work on 64-bit Windows. Additionally, changing from 32-bit to 64-bit or the other way around requires a fully clean install/re-install.

More: might give a look at www.distrowatch.org for a 32-bit version of Linux [Slackware is one listed], my versions are Linux Mint but all on 64-bit computers. A number of distros are available as LiveCD or LiveDVD, discs created from the downloaded .iso file are bootable, good to try before installing.
 
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what os you running as I can't run win 11 an alternate might be an option for the puter I'm building as it won't do win 11 either.
I use linux, mostly Debian or ubuntu inspired. For my Toshiba A200, I use LinuxLite. It was a snap to install and runs very well and I recommend it for a windows user. However, my computer needs are very modest so I don't do CAD, video editing, audio editing, gaming etc. YMMV.

I have another Toshiba L300 that runs Debian 11 and a Dell 1545 that also runs LinuxLite. Debian was a handfull to get everything set up nicely but after using linux since 2008, I'm kind of used to it.

Oh, should have added that I also have a windows 10 computer that I picked up for cheap. It gets a little lonely being all by itself.
 
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A friend was trying to get me to use linux for 10 years before I started using a computer in late 1999. Guess the change is coming.
 
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I use linux, mostly Debian or ubuntu inspired. For my Toshiba A200, I use LinuxLite. It was a snap to install and runs very well and I recommend it for a windows user. However, my computer needs are very modest so I don't do CAD, video editing, audio editing, gaming etc. YMMV.

I have another Toshiba L300 that runs Debian 11 and a Dell 1545 that also runs LinuxLite. Debian was a handfull to get everything set up nicely but after using linux since 2008, I'm kind of used to it.

Oh, should have added that I also have a windows 10 computer that I picked up for cheap. It gets a little lonely being all by itself.
SO I have AMD FX8370 black edition AM3 I'm into photo's and I maintain a website and 10 facebook groups and I have done it4 build and repair my own puters but never looked at linux do you have a suggestion for a starting OS that has same termology and will run photoshop 5.0 which is a 32bit program or photoshop 5.5 I can drop a folder with the soft ware in it say 5.0 then use that to upgrade to 5,5 then there's open office i think runs well with linux but unsure if my spreadsheets would move accross. then there is the format issue or no issue with moving files between windows and linux. If they didn't introduce the secority in the bios etc I wouldn't even be thinking of a move but in 18 months I have to be prepared for no support for win 10 there is no way I can afford to upgrade my hardware the OS and the motherboard.and being a carer I need the internet access.
 
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Linux is not windows and never will be. Even though there are ways to run windows specific programs in linux, it's not entirely problem free. If you're up for the challenge and likely a few sleepless nights, then you certainly can leave windows and it's environment, but I don't recommend it. Linux is great to use and learn with, without committing all your time and effort, but if your work is critical it may be beyond what you are willing to commit to.

My recommendation is to stay with windows 10, as it will be supported until 2025, giving you 3 1/2 years for MS to come up with something else or when you can get a computer that can run whatever MS has out at the time.

edit: Since we have pretty well destroyed this train, I think it would be better to start a new thread and leave this one alone.
 
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Linux is not windows and never will be. Even though there are ways to run windows specific programs in linux, it's not entirely problem free. If you're up for the challenge and likely a few sleepless nights, then you certainly can leave windows and it's environment, but I don't recommend it. Linux is great to use and learn with, without committing all your time and effort, but if your work is critical it may be beyond what you are willing to commit to.

My recommendation is to stay with windows 10, as it will be supported until 2025, giving you 3 1/2 years for MS to come up with something else or when you can get a computer that can run whatever MS has out at the time.

edit: Since we have pretty well destroyed this train, I think it would be better to start a new thread and leave this one alone.
Thanks didn't realise I had 3.5 years before panic. my notebook is the first Compac that could run win 10 2011 I got it.
 
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