.exe runs on xp but not win10

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I have a .exe slide show created on win 98. I t runs on XP and 2000. Will not run on win 10
 
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Right-click the executable, select "Properties", click on the "Compatibility" tab, check the box marked "Run this program in compatibility mode for:", select "Windows XP (Service Pack 3)" in the drop-down box and click "OK". You may also have to check the box marked "Run this program as an administrator".

Ben
 
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The mention of Windows 98 leads me to think. It may be a 16-bit exe? If so it will not run in a 64 bit operating system.
 
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Right-click the executable, select "Properties", click on the "Compatibility" tab, check the box marked "Run this program in compatibility mode for:", select "Windows XP (Service Pack 3)" in the drop-down box and click "OK". You may also have to check the box marked "Run this program as an administrator".

Ben
Thanks but I already tried that and no help.
 
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Unfortunately not that I am aware. Do you know for certain it is a 16 bit exe?
Thanks again.. I am pretty sure.. It was done using win 98 or win 2000 in sept 2002. It is a .exe slideshow with a ROSE for an icon. I used web found free software to generate the show. I can send you a copy if you think needed??
 
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Generally a 16-bit program has to be recompiled or played and recorded on 32-bit or 64-bit OS/programs so as to run on WinXP and later. Win10 and Win11 do not support 16-bit but do 32-bit and 64-bit. WinVista and later were available as either 32-bit or 64-bit. WinXP Pro-only was also available as 64-bit.
 
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A 32 bit OS has a compatibility layer for a 16 bit. A 64 bit OS has a compatibility layer for a 32 bit. The 64 bit OS does not have a compatibility layer for a 16 bit. For 16 bit to run on a 64 bit OS there is no compatibility layer and virtualization is needed. In virtualization a 16 bit supporting guest OS can be installed on the host OS.

In computing, Windows on Windows (commonly referred to as WOW),[1][2][3] was a compatibility layer of 32-bit versions of the Windows NT family of operating systems since 1993 with the release of Windows NT 3.1, which extends NTVDM to provide limited support for running legacy 16-bit programs written for Windows 3.x or earlier. There is a similar subsystem, known as WoW64, on 64-bit Windows versions that runs 32-bit programs.

This subsystem is not available in 64-bit editions prior to Windows 11 (including Windows Server 2008 R2 and later, which only have 64-bit editions) and therefore cannot run 16-bit software without third-party emulation software (e.g. DOSBox). Windows 10 is the final version of Windows to include this subsystem.

This subsystem has since been discontinued, as Windows 11 dropped support for 32-bit processors.
In computing on Microsoft platforms, WoW64 (Windows 32-bit on Windows 64-bit) is a subsystem of the Windows operating system capable of running 32-bit applications on 64-bit Windows. It is included in all 64-bit versions of Windows—including Windows XP Professional x64 Edition, IA-64 and x64 versions of Windows Server 2003, as well as x64 versions of Windows Vista, Windows Server 2008, Windows 7, Windows 8, Windows Server 2012, Windows 8.1, Windows 10, Windows Server 2016, Windows Server 2019, and Windows 11, as well as ARM64 versions of Windows 10, Windows 11 and Windows Server 2022, except in Windows Server Server Core where it is an optional component, and Windows Nano Server where it is not included. WoW64 aims to take care of many of the differences between 32-bit Windows and 64-bit Windows, particularly involving structural changes to Windows itself.
In full virtualization, the virtual machine simulates enough hardware to allow an unmodified "guest" OS (one designed for the same instruction set) to be run in isolation. This approach was pioneered in 1966 with the IBM CP-40 and CP-67, predecessors of the VM family.

Examples outside the mainframe field include Parallels Workstation, Parallels Desktop for Mac, VirtualBox, Virtual Iron, Oracle VM, Virtual PC, Virtual Server, Hyper-V, VMware Fusion, VMware Workstation, VMware Server (discontinued, formerly called GSX Server), VMware ESXi, QEMU, Adeos, Mac-on-Linux, Win4BSD, Win4Lin Pro, and Egenera vBlade technology.
Though virtualization may not be worth the trouble. If you are not dedicated in managing virtual disk. They can be a bit of a headache.
 
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Generally a 16-bit program has to be recompiled or played and recorded on 32-bit or 64-bit OS/programs so as to run on WinXP and later. Win10 and Win11 do not support 16-bit but do 32-bit and 64-bit. WinVista and later were available as either 32-bit or 64-bit. WinXP Pro-only was also available as 64-bit.
Thanks for to all for the info. Looks like only option is to rebuild with win 10 software.
 

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