SOLVED Printer has to be re-connected to Computer when it re-starts


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Hello All

I have recently upgraded my computer to an Acer Aspire H30 (i5). My old Brother laser printer (HL 5140) worked fine via W10 and W7 on a previous computer. Now, it only works if I unplug and re-connect the USB connector or the power supply, each time the computer re-starts.

On start up, the printer shows as off-line and if put it online (Devices and printers > right click > see what's printing > uncheck Use Printer offline) I get an error message (Printer is in an error state, or "Printer could print), until I disconnect the USB or the power cord and re-connect it. It will then work fine until I shut down the computer.

I have it connected by USB to a port at the rear of the Acer. In Printer properties it shows as being connected to port USB001 Virtual Printer Port. I'm using the most recent update of Windows 10.

I have checked the drivers: there are none available for download from Brother - not required apparently - and the installed driver is showing as "up to date".

I have spent the last week trying various "solutions" found online, but so far nothing works.

Any suggestions would be very welcome.

Stephen
 
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This is most likely a USB issue with your computer not the printer. And it may be a setting, not an actual problem.

I would check Windows first.

Go to Device Manager then Universal Serial Bus Controllers. On each USB Root Hub, right click then select Properties > Power Management, and uncheck the box for "Allow the computer to turn off this device to save power". Then reboot and see what happens.

There may also be a setting in the BIOS Setup Menu that disable power to USB ports during sleep mode. They all use different terminologies you may have to hunt around for it under Power options. But I would try the Windows Device Manager option first.
 
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This is most likely a USB issue with your computer not the printer. And it may be a setting, not an actual problem.

I would check Windows first.

Go to Device Manager then Universal Serial Bus Controllers. On each USB Root Hub, right click then select Properties > Power Management, and uncheck the box for "Allow the computer to turn off this device to save power". Then reboot and see what happens.

There may also be a setting in the BIOS Setup Menu that disable power to USB ports during sleep mode. They all use different terminologies you may have to hunt around for it under Power options. But I would try the Windows Device Manager option first.
Thank you for the reply. I followed your tips for changing the settings in device manager, but the problem is exactly as it was, previously. I had to disconnect the USB to make the printer work again after a re-boot.

I'm not sure how to change the BIOS setting that you mentioned, so I haven't tried that 2nd part of your solution for now.

Stephen
 
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Thank you for the reply. I followed your tips for changing the settings in device manager, but the problem is exactly as it was, previously. I had to disconnect the USB to make the printer work again after a re-boot.

I'm not sure how to change the BIOS setting that you mentioned, so I haven't tried that 2nd part of your solution for now.

Stephen
Update: I have since tried disabling USB "selective Suspend" in Power Options, but this also made no difference to the issue.
 
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Check your manual for accessing the BIOS Setup Menu. Typically it involves pressing the Del or some other key at the beginning of the boot process - you have to be quick when the prompt appears. Once in the menu, you can hunt around. Note that any change you make will NOT take effect or become permanent until you select "Save and Exit". If you select any other exit option, your changes will not take effect. So don't worry about messing things up.

Have you tried different USB ports?

Do you have more than one computer in your home that needs to print? You might consider turning the printer into a networked printer. Many routers have USB print servers built in. If yours does not, you can get a USB Print Server to turn your printer into a network server.

Even with just one computer, network printing is so much more convenient. The printer can be physically located in a more centralized location OFF YOUR DESK!!!! Even in a different room. Anyone can print to it - even at the same time and the server will sort out the print jobs. No computer has to be turned on for other computers to print. No sharing needs to be enabled for tighter security.

That said, USB can be unreliable. Since your printer uses a parallel port, you could used a Parallel Ethernet Print Server instead. The main problem here is your next printer may not have a parallel interface port. But then your next printer may have network printing built in so either option will end up in a drawer.
 
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Check your manual for accessing the BIOS Setup Menu. Typically it involves pressing the Del or some other key at the beginning of the boot process - you have to be quick when the prompt appears. Once in the menu, you can hunt around. Note that any change you make will NOT take effect or become permanent until you select "Save and Exit". If you select any other exit option, your changes will not take effect. So don't worry about messing things up.

Have you tried different USB ports?

Do you have more than one computer in your home that needs to print? You might consider turning the printer into a networked printer. Many routers have USB print servers built in. If yours does not, you can get a USB Print Server to turn your printer into a network server.

Even with just one computer, network printing is so much more convenient. The printer can be physically located in a more centralized location OFF YOUR DESK!!!! Even in a different room. Anyone can print to it - even at the same time and the server will sort out the print jobs. No computer has to be turned on for other computers to print. No sharing needs to be enabled for tighter security.

That said, USB can be unreliable. Since your printer uses a parallel port, you could used a Parallel Ethernet Print Server instead. The main problem here is your next printer may not have a parallel interface port. But then your next printer may have network printing built in so either option will end up in a drawer.
I got into BIOS fairly easily (pressing delete) and disabled DEEP POWER OFF MODE. This made no difference. I have also moved the USB to one of the two front ports, and tried the 4 at the back - also with no change to the issue.

I will look at the options for network and/or eithernet printing that you mentioned and take a trip to my local computer shop (a mere 2 hours round trip!).

The only other thing to mention is that when I first connected the printer to the new machine, about 2 weeks ago, I got an error message about it possibly not working with USB 3. However, only 2 of the 6 ports are USB 3, and I have only had it plugged in to the USB 2 slots, except than for the last try. I do wonder if this is connected to the problem, though,

All the USB ports work, but only when the printer is dis-connected and re-connected on start up, and then they work until I shut down! Very perplexing! Thanks again for your input.
 
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Trouble

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Do you typically turn off / power down the printer, before or after you power down the computer?
IS the printer always powered on before you power on the computer?
Does altering or changing either of those two patterns or practices seem to have any effect on the issue.
Two questions that will probably lead to nothing fruitful, just interested in the issue.
I do hate these kinds of problems as they are very difficult to diagnose and sometimes the remedy is so subtle, like swapping the USB cable or disabling bi-directional support (communications) in the print driver or updating the driver for the USB chipset or possibly even a firmware update for the printer in rare instances.
 
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Do you typically turn off / power down the printer, before or after you power down the computer?
IS the printer always powered on before you power on the computer?
Does altering or changing either of those two patterns or practices seem to have any effect on the issue.
Two questions that will probably lead to nothing fruitful, just interested in the issue.
I do hate these kinds of problems as they are very difficult to diagnose and sometimes the remedy is so subtle, like swapping the USB cable or disabling bi-directional support (communications) in the print driver or updating the driver for the USB chipset or possibly even a firmware update for the printer in rare instances.
1. No.
2. Yes.
3. Not sure. I'll trying changing the pattern.

Thanks for the suggestions. I have no idea how to do most of them, but I'll Google it. :)
 
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1. No.
2. Yes.
3. Not sure. I'll trying changing the pattern.

Thanks for the suggestions. I have no idea how to do most of them, but I'll Google it. :)
1. No.
2. Yes.
3. Not sure. I'll trying changing the pattern.

Thanks for the suggestions. I have no idea how to do most of them, but I'll Google it. :)
UPDATE: Switching the printer off before shutting the computer down and then back on, seems to have done the trick!! Such a small (subtle) remedy as you mentioned, but for me priceless! I have to say I never turn the printer on or off, and so I've learned something very important!
 
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A quick thank you to @Digerati and @Trouble for your help with this perplexing issue.

I would say that the resolution (switching the printer on and off) is probably more of a "workaround" than a real solution to the underlying problem...but, hey, it's saving me from plugging the USB cable in and out; much less tiresome on the fingers than flicking the on/off switch.

Much appreciated.
 
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Trouble

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probably more of a "workaround" than a real solution
I would agree.
And generally when you can remedy a problem by manually minipulating the power yourself then my go to target is going to be "power saving" settings somewhere on something perhaps even the printer itself.
I'm not a big fan of power savings in general.
When I'm done using my computer, I shut it down and anything attached to it and then I go one step further and turn off the switch on my surge suppressor / power strip, which everything is plugged into (with the exception of my three networking components).
I lost a charging block / AC adpater for a scanner a few years ago which was a bear to replace not to mention, way more expensive than it should have been. It was always on and the scanner was in power saver mode.
Since then, I take care of my own Energy Saving needs.
It seems that nothing anymore is actually completely off ...... off, but rather maintained in some "warm" limbo state for unknown reasons that I'm sure can fuel hours of big brother paranoia..
Me...... I just flip the switch, seems simple enough to me.
 
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I never turn my printer off either so that is a workaround. But unless you print often, it will just be a minor one - at least until you need a printout in a hurry and forget to turn it on. ;)
 
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Try this
1. Search Control Panel
2. Click View Devices and Printers
3. Make sure the printer is powered on
4. Select the printer - right click - trouble shoot
This will bring the printer online - print a test page
 
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My 2 cents worth if I may. I always turn my printer off. My thinking is that It's a USB/Wireless printer, so I treat it as one would with any USB device. That is, click on the icon in the system tray to "Safely remove hardware and eject media".
 
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My thinking is that It's a USB/Wireless printer, so I treat it as one would with any USB device
Ummm, sorry but your thinking is a bit flawed here.

USB and wireless too entirely different interfaces and therefore, are treated differently. A wireless printer is a networked printer and when not handling a print job, it is not really communicating with any computer. So the only reason to turn off a networked printer (even if connected directly to your router via USB or Ethernet) is to save a little bit of energy. But when you totally power off a networked printer, you risk shuffling IP addresses - where the router assigns, via DHCP, a different IP address next time you power up the printer. This matters because networked printers are setup in Windows using the assigned IP address. There is a workaround for that by using a static IP assignment for your networked printers.

If you connect your printer to your computer via USB, then you can disconnect the printer in the manner you mention, then power it off - though I would think if completely powered off (that is, not put into standby), there would be no need to "Safely remove hardware and eject media" as the printer would not be "seen" by the USB port.
 
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Digerati Thanks for the detailed explanation.
My printer is connected via USB. my desktop doesn't have WIFi but my Laptops do. When I'm done with the printer I just turn it off until required as I seldom use it since retiring, I don't actually go through the "Safely remove hardware and eject media" process.
 
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I don't actually go through the "Safely remove hardware and eject media"
You really should not have to. That function is really for attached "storage" devices - that is attached drives. When operating systems "open" files, those files are marked as "open" in the file tables on the disks. Also, to improve disk access performance, operating systems and disk controllers will delay writing to the disks and instead, will temporarily stuff data into the disk's built-in buffer (a type of "cache") - which is much faster than actually writing data to the disk. This lets the OS get back to other business more quickly and the drive's interface can then, in the background, write the data stored in the buffer to the disk at a more leisurely rate.

If you detach a drive while there are still files marked as open, or before buffered data can be saved to the disk, you risk corrupting the drive and/or losing data.

When you select the safely remove hardware option, this forces the closure of any opened files and ensures any buffered data is completely saved to disk before you are prompted to remove the device.

Since printers are not normally used a file "storage" devices (some do have memory card slots - but I doubt yours does), there is no need to go through that process.

BTW, in File Manager, you can go into the Properties > Policies for these attached devices and set the "Removal policy" to "Quick removal". This is the normal default so it may be set already. Quick removal, "Disables write caching on the device and in Windows, but you can disconnect the device safely without using the Safely Remove Hardware notification icon."

Disabling write caching will slightly degrade "write" (saves) performance with that drive because Windows will wait until all writes are complete. But this helps to ensure no data loss when pulling the device.
 

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