Stuck at the Automatic Repair Loop


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I went out of the house for half an hour, and when I returned my computer was shut.

I was in the middle of writing a paper, I wasn't even downloading anything and wasn't overloading it with programs - but since then it keeps on looping the automatic repair loop.

It says "the operating system couldn't be loaded because the NLS data is missing or contains errors.

Error code: 0xc0000102"



I had tried literally everything to get it up.

It wouldn't consider any safe mode, so I went to system recovery. I tried refreshing it, auto repair, Image recovery and System restore. System restore was really my last hope - I had a restore from the 16th of august and an earlier one from 11th, I tried them both. It just finishes it, then says;

"System Restore did not complete successfully. Your computer's system files and settings were not changed.

Details:

System Restore failed to replace the file (c:\programs files\windowsapps\8251macrorinaldi.notetiles_10.2.0.0_x64_9rvmmrcs6zgr6\sqlit... with its original copy from the restore point.

An unspecified error occurred during system restore (0x80070780)"

I went to the library, downloaded windows 10 on a usb drive, and tried to repair from it, but to no avail. It just says a problem occurred. I decided perhaps to reinstall (upgrade) it, but it just says that the installation started and that I need to take out the usb, reenter into windows and resume the installation in windows - but it never even logs into windows! It just gets stuck in the "Recovery" screen with the same message again.


As I have all the files, family pictures and literally everything saved on that computer, clearly I decided to go even further. I browsed the internet, and found a few things you could do on the command prompt, so I tried these:

chkdsk c:

chkdsk c: /f

bootrec /fixmbr
bootrec /fixboot
bootrec /rebuildbcd

I even tried this: copy c:\windows\system32\config\RegBack\* c:\windows\system32\config




ps. I bought my HP pavilion g6 with with a windows 8 - I upgraded to 8.1 - and then to windows 10 when it was available - but windows 10 had never done any problems and I've been enjoying it so far. I know this might not be relevant, but maybe it is, since I already have absolutely no idea what to do. Resetting/formatting partitions isn't an option, because I need my files back as soon as possible.

Any answer/suggestion would be welcomed!
 
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Regedit32

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Hi yeolmonstor,

Welcome to the forum.

I note you have inquired about this on HP forums also - a good idea as HP will likely be able to provide support to your computer. Someone there has all ready suggested an alternate OS to log in with, which you could then use to search through your Windows section to recover and save important files to an alternate source.

They also mentioned the idea of using an alternate Hard Drive - installing Windows 10 to that, then using cables to slave the new drive to your old one which would also allow you to grab important files and move to a new location.

It seems to me you have all ready done a lot of editing, and I would advise some caution as while I appreciate you are trying to recover your system, you need to be very careful not to take a bad situation and make it far worse as incorrect editing could make it near impossible to recover data from.

The one thing that sticks out to me from your thread is the initial error message re NLS files and the fact you are apparently a Student. NLS files are your language support files for Windows. NLS means National Language Support. These files are located at C:\Windows\System32 in Windows 10. If you delete a file like this from your computer this can trigger the error message you are seeing - but I am assuming you never deleted one of these files.

I am wondering though whether you are using any form of VM style software though which allows you to have some kind of Virtual Box to share files with your School and home computer. The reason I ask this, is because these types of academic applications generally have a boot file text log and if your Windows updates ran while you were out its possible a minor change within Windows is not currently supported by the VM software you are running. If that was the case you might need to add some of the NLS or maybe even all of them to the bootfile log for that VM program to prevent the error; which then may allow Windows to load normally.

If you could report back what additional applications you are running on your computer - especially, if it is an Academic program that functions as I attempted to describe in layman's terms as this would assist if finding a resolution for your issue.
 
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Hi yeolmonstor,

Welcome to the forum.

I note you have inquired about this on HP forums also - a good idea as HP will likely be able to provide support to your computer. Someone there has all ready suggested an alternate OS to log in with, which you could then use to search through your Windows section to recover and save important files to an alternate source.

They also mentioned the idea of using an alternate Hard Drive - installing Windows 10 to that, then using cables to slave the new drive to your old one which would also allow you to grab important files and move to a new location.

It seems to me you have all ready done a lot of editing, and I would advise some caution as while I appreciate you are trying to recover your system, you need to be very careful not to take a bad situation and make it far worse as incorrect editing could make it near impossible to recover data from.

The one thing that sticks out to me from your thread is the initial error message re NLS files and the fact you are apparently a Student. NLS files are your language support files for Windows. NLS means National Language Support. These files are located at C:\Windows\System32 in Windows 10. If you delete a file like this from your computer this can trigger the error message you are seeing - but I am assuming you never deleted one of these files.

I am wondering though whether you are using any form of VM style software though which allows you to have some kind of Virtual Box to share files with your School and home computer. The reason I ask this, is because these types of academic applications generally have a boot file text log and if your Windows updates ran while you were out its possible a minor change within Windows is not currently supported by the VM software you are running. If that was the case you might need to add some of the NLS or maybe even all of them to the bootfile log for that VM program to prevent the error; which then may allow Windows to load normally.

If you could report back what additional applications you are running on your computer - especially, if it is an Academic program that functions as I attempted to describe in layman's terms as this would assist if finding a resolution for your issue.


So here's what happened;
I downloaded Linux from a library computer, and it installed perfectly well and worked smoothly.
I'm a programming student - so yeah, I know that every little file in every system makes a huge difference, so I'm not as stupid as deleting such files, and I try not to mess, at all, with that part of my computer.
As for the NLS files. I don't know - I don't have any special software for school, everything is on the internet. The only program that I use to share files is google drive, which is... internet-based as I never bothered actually downloading it.

After I downloaded Linux, I popped in a flash drive, downloaded manually all my most important files through the command prompt (I would like to thank google for being with me through this crucial process) - and just clicked on the reset.
And it worked. I'm writing right now from my laptop as we speak - it works just as smoothly as it did before.

The only thing that bugs me about this situation is why did this happened, and how do I prevent it from happening again?
 

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