Cannot remove read only attribute from my documents folder.


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This is really pissing me off at this point. I play video games and all my games are saved in my documents as many other steam users but the games cannot load any save data from countless games like skyrim, Arma 3 etc. As soon as I remove the read only attribute from the document folder and apply the settings it does the whole apply to all the sub folders and files crap but as soon as its done I click okay and right after i check the properties again and voila there it is read only is checked and i cannot do jack about it.
 

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Noob Whisperer
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I'm pretty sure that the "read only attribute" you are talking about, doesn't have anything to do with it.
You need to right click the parent container (C:\users\YourUserName\Documents or which ever folder is giving you fits.
Choose properties after right clicking and select the Security tab from along the top.
Examine the permissions and edit or add as needed with respect to your specific account name so you have full access.
Make sure to cascade that down to all subfolders and files.
That should do it.

There have been some instances with respect to some access (maybe has something to do with games and their related files IDK) needing to add the "HomeUsers" Group.
I've been doing this for about 2 decades now and I'm not sure why that would be, but perhaps because your user account is also a member of the "HomeUsers" Group and as a consequence, because of conflicting group membership and their respective access rights, you would need to add that group.
Generally I always make sure that my personal account is a member of the Local Administrators Group and only the Local Administrators Group.
 
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Actually, simt'pal's problem is a little more complicated than that. I had the same thing, and was unable to change anything in the Security tab, either.

Try this instead:
Go to "This PC - Windows (C: - Users" and right-click the one that has the problem.
Click "Properties" and choose the "Sharing" tab.
Click "Share". In the lower box, you should see at least two rows: one is "Everyone" with a permission level of "Read-only", and another one with a permission level of "Owner". Type in the name of the "Owner", and click "ADD". Finally, click "Share" at the bottom of the box.
It'll take a couple of minutes, though not very long, and then a message appears telling you that the items have been shared. Click "done" and your problem should be fixed.

Good luck!
 

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Noob Whisperer
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Hello Gembirdie and welcome to the forum.
Actually..... you should probably take some time and read up on Share Permissions versus NTFS Permissions.
Share Permissions have no influence or impact on local users accessing local files or folder. They are only used to control access to shares over the network, while.....
NTFS Security permissions are what dictate a local user's ability to read, write, modify, etc., local files and or folders on the local machine.
You do not (and probably should not) need or have to "Share" a folder or file in order for a local user or group to have local access while logging on locally.
NTFS permissions determine the action users can take for a folder or file both across the network and locally. Unlike share permissions, NTFS permissions offer several other permissions besides Full Control, Change, and Read that can be set for groups or individually. The most restrictive permission applies when share and NTFS permissions conflict.
Share permissions are the permissions you set for a folder when you share that folder. The share permissions determine the type of access others have to the shared folder across the network. There are three types of share permissions: Full Control, Change, and Read.
SOURCE: http://www.techrepublic.com/article/learn-the-basic-differences-between-share-and-ntfs-permissions/

As I mentioned above....
Been doing this for a long time. Although I've been retired for 11 years, people still pay me to consult on network issues both physical as well as access issues involving everything from basic to more sophisticated Active Directory Domain considerations involving robust Group Policy issues.
 
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Sim't. You referred to "MY documents"?
Maybe a typo, but, fwiw, My documents is a system folder and cannot be opened without hacking. If this is the folder you are trying to open, look instead for username/documents.

But, unzip the attached and run the appropriate reg. If you then right click the folder you are trying to enter, it will give you a "Take Ownership" option
 

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Hello Gembirdie and welcome to the forum.
Actually..... you should probably take some time and read up on Share Permissions versus NTFS Permissions.
Share Permissions have no influence or impact on local users accessing local files or folder. They are only used to control access to shares over the network, while.....
NTFS Security permissions are what dictate a local user's ability to read, write, modify, etc., local files and or folders on the local machine.
You do not (and probably should not) need or have to "Share" a folder or file in order for a local user or group to have local access while logging on locally.


SOURCE: http://www.techrepublic.com/article/learn-the-basic-differences-between-share-and-ntfs-permissions/

As I mentioned above....
Been doing this for a long time. Although I've been retired for 11 years, people still pay me to consult on network issues both physical as well as access issues involving everything from basic to more sophisticated Active Directory Domain considerations involving robust Group Policy issues.
Gembirdie: Well, this is really interesting because your solution didn't resolve my problem, but mine did. So I'm sure you know better, but the fact remains.

Please keep in mind that people like me, who don't know what they're doing (and I'm NOT being sarcastic here), can get themselves in trouble that no programmer can anticipate, because they would know better.

So maybe I'm comparing apples to oranges, and maybe you can figure out in which situation your solution works, and in which it doesn't, but mine works. I sure don't know.

For anybody reading this thread, it would be safe to tell them to try your solution first, and mine only second.
 
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Just like to add. If my surmise is correct, in my previous post, following Gembirdie's path, with a "system" folder, will still result in a popup stating "This folder cannot be shared"

Applying the attached fix from my post, or manually altering the permissions, will, however, gain access. This would be inadvisable and possibly dangerous for the less knowledgeable.
 

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