Corrupt files after WindowsImageBackup - sfc /scannow


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Finally, after a third attempt to clean install Windows 10 version 1511, things have been running well so today I decided to perform a WindowsImageBackup just to be 'safe.' Prior to the backup I ran sfc /scannow which reported no corruptions.

The image backup finished but reported it was unsuccessful due to bad blocks on my C: drive. But running error checking under the "Tools" tab of the drive reported a successful scan with no errors. However, running chkdsk from a command prompt reported 8KB in bad blocks. I couldn't run chkdsk /f on the C: drive since it's the Windows drive and in use at the time.

Also, running sfc /scannow now reports two corrupted files that it can't repair because the source files are also corrupt! The two files are UIAutomationCore.dll & wfapigp.dll.

Everything is still running fine as far as I can tell so should I be worried?
 
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Noob Whisperer
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running chkdsk from a command prompt reported 8KB in bad blocks.
Personally, anytime I have a hard disk reporting any bad sectors after having run ChkDsk, I immediately backup all my critical data and buy a new replacement drive.
I would also create a full disk image as a second form of backup. I use Acronis True Image for this as one of the error handling options that it supports when creating a disk image is to "Ignore bad sectors"
There are other options that are available, it is just my personal choice when it comes to disk imaging.
https://www.windows10forums.com/threads/please-for-your-own-peace-of-mind.794/
I couldn't run chkdsk /f on the C: drive since it's the Windows drive and in use at the time.
You can run chkdsk /R on your windows drive, all you have to do is respond with a "Y" when prompted and reboot your machine and let it run.
 
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Thanks for that answer. I didn't know about the /R switch.

I have all of my 'library' files on another partition and one of the first things I do after a Windows re-install is to point the My Documents, Music, etc. libraries to that partition. That way re-installing Windows doesn't cause me much anxiety but it always takes several hours to finish installing the other programs. (I keep those installation files on yet another partition.) I backup all of these to another physical drive too, just in case the whole primary drive fails. Hence, the reason I wanted to create a WindowsImageBackup on that other physical drive.

1. So if I open an Admin command prompt window and run "chkdsk /r", should I expect the /r job to run upon initial reboot, then restart Windows when finished?

2. Will chkdsk /r mark & 'quarantine' the bad blocks so that Windows doesn't attempt to use them in the future?

3. Should I run chkdsk /r /f instead of just chkdsk /r ?

Thanks.
 

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Noob Whisperer
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So if I open an Admin command prompt window and run "chkdsk /r", should I expect the /r job to run upon initial reboot, then restart Windows when finished?
yes
Will chkdsk /r mark & 'quarantine' the bad blocks so that Windows doesn't attempt to use them in the future?
yes.... or at least it is suppose to mark those sectors as "bad" to prevent any further attempted use by the OS. However, if you're presently marking bad sectors, then that is not good, as there may be more heading your way.
Should I run chkdsk /r /f instead of just chkdsk /r
NOPE..... chkdsk /R implies /F so adding it to the command line is just reduntant. Do a chkdsk /? and read, I think you'll see that adjacent to the /R information in the help info.
 
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yes.... or at least it is suppose to mark those sectors as "bad" to prevent any further attempted use by the OS. However, if you're presently marking bad sectors, then that is not good, as there may be more heading your way.

I see. That must be why the "Tools" tab of the drive reported a successful scan with no errors, right? I guess I should keep my eye on the total size of bad sectors. Only 8K now, but I've never run CHKDSK before and have had the drive for over a year.
 
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Noob Whisperer
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It's been widely rumored that some drives actually ship new, with bad sectors. I haven't found this to be the case.
If you haven't already, you should enable S.M.A.R.T in the BIOS, it can sometimes give you a heads-up if the drive continues failing.
 

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