SOLVED GPT to MBR disk drive to convert.


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I have lately read in Computer magazines, that drives should use the MBR format. Apparently, a check can be observed in Windows disk management, this I carried out in my computer, but find neither format are mentioned. It would be appreciate if any member could help me in finding this reading.
 
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Actually what you heard is exactly wrong. MBR is legacy and no longer used except for very old machines that don't support 64 Bit window.
To find out if your hard drives are still in BIOS/MBR mode Look in Disk Management, You OS if it is in BIOS Mode you'll likely have only 2 partitions. If your In UEFI GPT mode You will have at least 3 partitions One Being EFI which is your boot Management partition.
In disk Management where you see each disk/SSD GIF Right-click on the DISK 0, DISK 1, etc and you'll see either convert to MBR if your already GPT or Convert to GPT is your already MBR. In 32 Bit Windows Installation, your Disk is limited to 4 partitions of 2TB So I guess it doesn't matter for storage whether you use MBR or GPT for under 2TB drives 64Bit Windows Installation Use UEFI and GPT disk/SSD. There are good reasons that MBR is Legacy and GPT is superior technology. To learn all the reasons for
Disk Management.jpg
Google it.
 
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No argument , Clint. But I would suggest that your first remark is not entirely correct.

Among my associates, MBR is still widely used. To suggest to most of them that they change to GPT, even those with reasonably up to date computers, leaves hanging jaws and looks of wonderment!
But, perhaps Rab would be interested in reading this? (Not my own work!)

ComparisonMBR (Master Boot Record)GPT (GUID Partition Table)
Supported Partition NumbersMaximum 4 partitions.Maximum 128 partitions.
Supported Disk Capacity2TB (for 512B sector), 16TB (for 4Kn sector)No disk capacity limit (2^64 logical blocks for 512B or 4Kn sector)
Supported Boot ModeBIOSUEFI
Supported OS
  • Windows 10/8/7, Linux
  • Windows Server 2016/2012/2008
  • Windows XP/Vista (64bit for data only)
  • macOS and modern Mac OS X
  • Windows 7/Windows XP/Vista


Which Is Better? Advantages of GPT Disk over MBR Disk
According to the comparison table, it's clear that the advantages of GPT disk exceed MBR disk, which is especially obvious in the following aspects:

  • Faster Boot Speed: GPT UEFI can load the operating system faster than traditional MBR BIOS boot mode.
  • Better Operating System Compatibility: GPT has better OS compatibility than MBR as it supports most operating systems, including Windows Server and macOS.
  • Advanced Data Protection: GPT contains the backup of the primary GPT header and partition entries that protects data on the disk better.
 
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No argument , Clint. But I would suggest that your first remark is not entirely correct.

Among my associates, MBR is still widely used. To suggest to most of them that they change to GPT, even those with reasonably up to date computers, leaves hanging jaws and looks of wonderment!
But, perhaps Rab would be interested in reading this? (Not my own work!)

ComparisonMBR (Master Boot Record)GPT (GUID Partition Table)
Supported Partition NumbersMaximum 4 partitions.Maximum 128 partitions.
Supported Disk Capacity2TB (for 512B sector), 16TB (for 4Kn sector)No disk capacity limit (2^64 logical blocks for 512B or 4Kn sector)
Supported Boot ModeBIOSUEFI
Supported OS
  • Windows 10/8/7, Linux
  • Windows Server 2016/2012/2008
  • Windows XP/Vista (64bit for data only)
  • macOS and modern Mac OS X
  • Windows 7/Windows XP/Vista


Which Is Better? Advantages of GPT Disk over MBR Disk
According to the comparison table, it's clear that the advantages of GPT disk exceed MBR disk, which is especially obvious in the following aspects:

  • Faster Boot Speed: GPT UEFI can load the operating system faster than traditional MBR BIOS boot mode.
  • Better Operating System Compatibility: GPT has better OS compatibility than MBR as it supports most operating systems, including Windows Server and macOS.
  • Advanced Data Protection: GPT contains the backup of the primary GPT header and partition entries that protects data on the disk better.
Ok then I should have added in MHO, I guess since i don't use Linux and all my units are on 64Bit Window, I forgot there are others still very happy with MBR Thanks for the comment Dave
 
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No argument , Clint. But I would suggest that your first remark is not entirely correct.

Among my associates, MBR is still widely used. To suggest to most of them that they change to GPT, even those with reasonably up to date computers, leaves hanging jaws and looks of wonderment!
But, perhaps Rab would be interested in reading this? (Not my own work!)

ComparisonMBR (Master Boot Record)GPT (GUID Partition Table)
Supported Partition NumbersMaximum 4 partitions.Maximum 128 partitions.
Supported Disk Capacity2TB (for 512B sector), 16TB (for 4Kn sector)No disk capacity limit (2^64 logical blocks for 512B or 4Kn sector)
Supported Boot ModeBIOSUEFI
Supported OS
  • Windows 10/8/7, Linux
  • Windows Server 2016/2012/2008
  • Windows XP/Vista (64bit for data only)
  • macOS and modern Mac OS X
  • Windows 7/Windows XP/Vista


Which Is Better? Advantages of GPT Disk over MBR Disk
According to the comparison table, it's clear that the advantages of GPT disk exceed MBR disk, which is especially obvious in the following aspects:

  • Faster Boot Speed: GPT UEFI can load the operating system faster than traditional MBR BIOS boot mode.
  • Better Operating System Compatibility: GPT has better OS compatibility than MBR as it supports most operating systems, including Windows Server and macOS.
  • Advanced Data Protection: GPT contains the backup of the primary GPT header and partition entries that protects data on the disk better.
Hmm I don't remember XP or Vista having a 64 Bit Versions? Seem the UEIF/GPT Supported OS left out Windows 7 SP1 64 Bit 8, 8.1, and 10?
I found this interesting article on MBR vs GPT https://queries365.wordpress.com/2018/11/08/mbr-vs-gpt-which-one-is-more-robust-and-reliable/
 
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There seem to be an absolute rainfall of articles on the subject. Since this thread began, I have been reading several. Some of which contradict.
Whilst I have experienced GPT on various computers, I honestly cannot see why the average domestic user would need it? Certainly, in my case, the people I help are, on the whole, not so young. None of them would have use for more than a 2tb hd. Even for youngster game players, that is a lot of space. My own preference is an external, where extras can be stored and put out of the way for security.

Forgive my rants below - this is a little bit of a grey are for me, as far as in depth knowledge goes:

You link is similar to most others. About three years old, but I doubt much has changed. Some isolated quotes:

Whenever a new window is installed in a system, then it asks for the mode of disk partition: MBR or GPT.
Truthfully, I have never experienced that with windows. Did a fresh install two days ago?

The MBR, Windows Operating System automatically separates a primary partition to store data and divide the remaining space into an extended partition.
Not sure, again, that i understand that. I have never experienced an installation on an empty SSD/HD creating and "extended" partition. I have found, if needed, that has to be done manually after the installation?

1. I am using MBR for a long time, and I really need to extend the partition in the MBR disk. What should I need to do?
Easily done with command prompt or Disk management. I am, again, a little vague on its real practical use though

2. I am having a huge amount of data in my system and my windows are not allowing me to save more data, due to the 2Tb size of my hard drive. How can I save my data?
Try an external disk.

FWIW. There were, indeed, 64bit versions of XP and Vista
Anyway, I have finished spouting on a subject of which I have little experience. I think the OP has enough info now to work out his problem if any!
 
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Hmm I don't remember XP or Vista having a 64 Bit Versions?
I have 64 bit versions of both. The 64 bit version of XP came late in XP's release, and had terrible driver support. 64 bit Vista was common place. Had it on multiple PC's.
 
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Correct. I gave up on XP and went back to 32bit. I was committed, for various reasons, to keep trying with Vista. It wasn't the bad OS as it was painted. The driver producers were still lingering with new software and rather let down MS. They began to get their act together with Windows 8/8.1
 
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There seem to be an absolute rainfall of articles on the subject. Since this thread began, I have been reading several. Some of which contradict.
Whilst I have experienced GPT on various computers, I honestly cannot see why the average domestic user would need it? Certainly, in my case, the people I help are, on the whole, not so young. None of them would have use for more than a 2tb hd. Even for youngster game players, that is a lot of space. My own preference is an external, where extras can be stored and put out of the way for security.

Forgive my rants below - this is a little bit of a grey are for me, as far as in depth knowledge goes:

You link is similar to most others. About three years old, but I doubt much has changed. Some isolated quotes:

Whenever a new window is installed in a system, then it asks for the mode of disk partition: MBR or GPT.
Truthfully, I have never experienced that with windows. Did a fresh install two days ago?

Actually, if you want to install 64 Bit UEFI you have to boot your install media in UEFI mode I have never been asked either.

The MBR, Windows Operating System automatically separates a primary partition to store data and divide the remaining space into an extended partition.
Not sure, again, that i understand that. I have never experienced an installation on an empty SSD/HD creating and "extended" partition. I have found, if needed, that has to be done manually after the installation?

I agree I have always set up my own partitions after the OS install is completed.


1. I am using MBR for a long time, and I really need to extend the partition in the MBR disk. What should I need to do?
Easily done with command prompt or Disk management. I am, again, a little vague on its real practical use though

My introduction to 64 Bit Windows and UEFI came about in 2012 or so When I purchased my Asus G75VW. I had to relearn all that I knew about installing Windows. and actually I have never looked back. By 2015 all my computers were running in UEFI mode including my Z97 MB home-built computers. All the notebooks purchase since 2012 have come from the factory UEFI


2. I am having a huge amount of data in my system and my windows are not allowing me to save more data, due to the 2Tb size of my hard drive. How can I save my data?
Try an external disk.

Actually, with modern motherboards, GPT is supported even in a 32-bit Legacy system so all that is needed for a storage disk is to convert it to GPT The real 2TB restriction is for bootable hard drives/SSD

FWIW. There were, indeed, 64bit versions of XP and Vista
Anyway, I have finished spouting on a subject of which I have little experience. I think the OP has enough info now to work out his problem if any!
This I did not know this, my first experience with 64 bit and UEFI/GPT was with Windows 7 Sp1 and my G75VY 2012, at that point in time for windows 7 to run 64 bit UEFI, Service Pack 1 was required. So you got me on that one
OBTW I am 73.5 years young. I use 64bit installs and UEFI/GPT for the same reason I use SSD's and High-speed internet. I remember well my First DSL dual-line connection forgot the actual speed 256Kb about, that was screaming back them only a T1 was faster and I don't think any T1 were accessible to ordinary people or I would have had one.

I think the OP dropped out awhile back.
 

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