How to disconnect a license from a system.


Joined
Jun 1, 2015
Messages
20
Reaction score
2
Greetings,

I have an older home-built system for which I had Windows 10 on it. I removed Windows 10 because I want to use this version for a brand new system I'm building. I didn't realize at the time I removed Windows from the old system that I needed to follow instructions to disconnect the license so that it will be free to use on my new system.

So, without Windows installed on my old system, is there still a way to disconnect it from that system?

Thanks.

Keith
 
Joined
Oct 12, 2015
Messages
142
Reaction score
21
If your W10 is an OEM version, the license is usually only valid for the system originally installed on. If it is a retail version, you should be able to transfer it with no problem. I suggest installing W10 on the new system, and if you have activation issues, call Microsoft for activation help, or post back here. I have had to contact M.S. a few times after activation issues. The process was always tedious, but it always worked. I thing the contact procedure was different each time I contacted M.S.

I know that you can "deactivate" a licence, but I don't think it matters. I'm not sure M.S. would even know that you did.
 
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
Oct 2, 2014
Messages
1,128
Reaction score
204
If it's the retail version of Windows 10, it's definitely transferable. Usually there's no issue, but like Garyw said, a call to Microsoft's phone activation usually fixes that. Install Windows 10 on the new PC, but skip putting in the Windows key during installation. Once Windows is up and running, go to Settings and activate from there. It should go fine, but you may be prompted to call Microsoft. Activating in on a different PC will deactivate it on the other. But this only works with the retail version. The OEM version is non transferable.
 
Joined
Jun 1, 2015
Messages
20
Reaction score
2
... but skip putting in the Windows key during installation. Once Windows is up and running, go to Settings and activate from there.
Now why is that? Is that just so you can get Windows up and running if the Product Key doesn't take?

Okay, thanks guys. Oh, and Gary, yeah, you can run a deactivation process to remove the key registration from Windows, and no, that doesn't make a difference on Microsoft's side, so I've read.

Thanks again.
 
Joined
Oct 2, 2014
Messages
1,128
Reaction score
204
Now why is that? Is that just so you can get Windows up and running if the Product Key doesn't take?
Yeah, basically. You can put the key during installation, but I find it easier to just get Windows up and running first, then insert the key and activate. It does make it easier if the activation doesn't take. Either way will work. Just my preference. I probably should have clarified that. Sorry.
 
Joined
Jun 1, 2015
Messages
20
Reaction score
2
I'm on it. Thanks. I'll be building a brand new system here very shortly. Have all the parts, but I'm still playing around with Linux on my old home-built.

Thanks
 
Joined
Sep 26, 2017
Messages
1,334
Reaction score
216
To confirm, the OEM and System Builder versions are only for the system they came with while the Retail version is transferable to a Replacement computer but can't be used on both at the same time.
 
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
Oct 2, 2014
Messages
1,128
Reaction score
204
I'm on it. Thanks. I'll be building a brand new system here very shortly. Have all the parts, but I'm still playing around with Linux on my old home-built.

Thanks
Better be careful. You may find you prefer linux.
 
Joined
Sep 26, 2017
Messages
1,334
Reaction score
216
Better be careful. You may find you prefer linux.
Agree. I have a Desktop and a Notebook with Linux Mint 19.x, could easily replace Windows except for some programs not available for Linux [nor for Mac OS].
 
Joined
Jun 1, 2015
Messages
20
Reaction score
2
Better be careful. You may find you prefer linux.
Oh... that is another story. For the last week and a half, I have studied my butt off in what I guess you could call a crash-course into Linux. Okay, I get the theory and procedure for installing, I get repositories, I get the file system, I get the command line—that's all said and good. What was an absolute pain was installing WINE so I could run a few Windows programs. Oh, my gosh! It's not enough that there's a ton of information to wade through just to get this done, but trying to read past the WINE-programmer's language and make sense of exactly what I'm supposed to do was ridiculous. I'm lucky if finally worked (and I wouldn't know how to do it again).

In a few other areas as well, it wasn't fun. It's still too geeky with command line requirements just to install or fix some things. If there weren't forums and available help, it would have been hopeless. Such is seldom the case in Windows. It's a trade off, still, one I'm not ready to deal with—I can't risk running the Windows programs I need in environments (e.g., WINE) in which an improper upgrade process may cause resources within these programs to scatter; the programs were meant for Windows, so that's where I'll be staying. Yeah, there are alternative programs, but not for the Bible programs I need (photography, yeah).

In a nutshell!
 
Joined
Sep 26, 2017
Messages
1,334
Reaction score
216
in which an improper upgrade process may cause resources within these programs to scatter
One nice feature of Linux which I'll be using to set up on a couple of Notebooks for out local animal shelter this summer is their LTS/Long Term Service, Linux Mint 19 has about 4 years left and it doesn't force updates like Windows. It'll make good use of 2 Notebooks that are used only a couple times a year for a Vaccination Clinic for the public, can be put in use without delaying for updates. Most versions of Linux have a Software Updater that can be used as desired by the user.
 
Joined
Jun 1, 2015
Messages
20
Reaction score
2
Yeah, I agree, Bighorn, about the update (or rather non-update) aspect of Linux. But...Windows is giving us 30 days now...THIRTY DAYS before they force the updates on us. Woo-hoo!!

And yeah, the Software Manager for Mint is great, but having installed WINE through it didn't work, and that led to the fiasco and debacle I went through. And from what I've read about it, you have to do this, that and the other when upgrading (again, written for those, apparently, who understand the whole thing), or things can go south.

I'll definitely keep MInt on my old box I built (which is what I'm using to get familiar with it), but I'm building a new system, and I have no reason to dual boot: my two Bible programs, Photoshop Elements 15, as well as Darktable, GIMP and Raw Therapee all run on Windows. Otherwise, I would have made the jump...or at least dual booted.
 
Joined
Nov 19, 2013
Messages
4,250
Reaction score
824
LOL. Perhaps you two guys would like to continue in the "Off-Topic" section to discuss Linux. . Windows 10 not mentioned now for several posts.
 
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
Jun 1, 2015
Messages
20
Reaction score
2
Oh, that's true, isn't it! Well, I think we're finished.
...Windows 10, Windows 10, Windows 10. (That should make up a little bit Ha!)

Hey, thanks all for the help.
 

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Top