SFC + DISM + Update FAILURE


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Dell Optiplex 745 5GB, 250GB, 3GHZ upgraded from 7 to 10.
No backup. No system image. Reversion impossible. No restore points predating the problem.

Windows Updates take two days to download, always fail.
SFC can not start.
DISM returns an error message and goes home.

Renew, Restore & Reset all fail. Recovery Disk fails. Update Iso fails. Updates are dependent on DISM.
 
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Regedit32

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Hi Ben,

It sure sounds like you have a major issue here.

Some questions for you:
  • Has this computer been infected by a virus that you are aware of? If yes, any idea of virus name?
  • When you said, ' No system image ', what happened here? Did you intentionally remove this image? Did you do a clean install of Windows 10 by formatting the Hard Drive first before installing, rather than just upgrading the OS itself?
  • Where are you trying to run SFC (System File Checker from?
    • Non privileged Command Prompt: C:\Users\<your username>, or
    • Elevated Command Prompt: C:\WINDOWS\System32> (i.e. Admin Privileges)
  • What is the error message you are getting from Deployment Image Servicing and Management (DISM)?
  • Also, where are you attempting to run DISM from?
    • Non privileged Command Prompt: C:\Users\<your username>
    • Elevated Command Prompt: C:\WINDOWS\System32>
    • Powershell console (or within a Command Prompt console for example: PS C:\WINDOWS\System32>
  • When the Recovery Disk fails is there a specific error message, or does the Disk simply not boot at all?
  • Is this a Windows 10 Recovery Disk?
  • Was the Recovery Disk created on your computer?
  • You mentioned the Update ISO failed too. I assume you mean you downloaded a Windows 10 ISO. Did you run this as a Virtual Drive (i.e. double clicked and ran the setup), or did you also download Media Creation Tool from Microsoft and create a USB or CD/DVD Windows 10 ISO disk?
  • Finally, have you run any of the Built in Dell utilities to check your computer for hardware, ram, failure, etcetera? Are you even able to run these utilities?

Sorry for all the questions, but the more information we have the more likely we can find a solution that will work for you.

Right now, based on the information you've all ready provided its tempting to suggest a Manual install of Windows 7 (the original OS on your computer) but that is not as simple as it may sound. We need to make sure your Hard Drive is sound, make sure you have your Product Key etcetera, and obviously you'd need a copy of the Windows 7 Disks (which going by Dells website may not have been provided with your particular model).

Its worth noting Dell also alerts they have not and have no intention at this time of providing updated drivers for your computer to run in the Windows 10 environment. That could mean it simply is not capable because of old hardware that is not compatible with Windows 10, or that there is no need to as its hardware, drivers, etcetera all meet the minimum specs required for a Successful Windows 10 upgrade or clean install; however they do not state this (which makes me lean towards the latter).

Regards,

Regedit32
 
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Thank you for the rapid response! Malwarebytes, ASC Malware Fighter, Immunet3 and Windows Defender all return clean reports: no infections.

No system image: I did not create any backup of 7 or 10.

Upgrade to 10 was not a clean install: no reformat. It took 7 hours to use MCT to make an ISO on a usb stick. There were three tries 'cuz 10 delivers a network driver that will not work on the Broadcom NetXtreme 57XX and I had trouble finding one. that works.

SFC: elevated cmd, Power Shell, Tweaking.com Windows Repair & Winfix. Same for DISM, and tried in Safe Mode as well. Error 193: %1 is not a valid windows application.

ISO & Recovery Disk only report failure, nothing specific. A glance at one log file indicated problems copying files, but there was much more, stuff beyond my knowledge. I learned in another forum that the ISO needs DISM to install. Since the RD includes a wim file, I presume it also needs DISM.

Windows 10 RD on a memory stick created on this computer after the trouble started. :(

Used MCT. One ISO on external HD, One on internal HD, one on usb stick, one on DVD. Same results.

I have not run Dell Diagnostics. Not sure what, if anything is on the machine or where to find it. Chkdsk returns no errors. Bought it last summer, it was "refurbished"; looks like all they did to it was reinstall W7.

Good guess! I do not have Install media for W7. Product key is on a little label with very fine print and I have DME in my right eye . Cataract surgery eliminated my ability to read fine print. Barely possible with 7D readers; can not be sure of all the letters. I am not sure that Installer would work with DISM disabled. I know the W10 ISO can't.

Dell indicates not knowing or caring about compatibility. Microsoft readiness test indicated it would work. Broadcom uploaded 3 driver versions for their NIC in '15, none of them will work with 10. I am using an older driver. No other driver issues so far

This system only has USB ports, no PS2. The Repair Option starts and hangs 'cuz it does not recognize the mouse & keyboard so it is impossible to make selections. .
 

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Windows 10 RD on a memory stick created on this computer after the trouble started.

Hi Ben,

I could be mistaken but my guess is a Recovery Disk made after the troubles began means that disk will contain back ups of potentially corrupted Windows system files and / or corrupted Registry entries. That may make this not very useful for the time being.

If you made the Recovery Disk from another computer then you may be able to extract some files from it in isolation, but the System settings saved in the creation of the disk will not work on your computer as they are unique to the computer the Disk was created on.

Regarding your Windows ISO you downloaded, did you end up with Install.wim, or Install.esd?

If the ISO file you downloaded is on your computer still and you can access it:
  • Right-click | select mount
  • Open the Sources folder
  • Look for Install file | is it Install.wim, or Install.esd

Regarding your computer; how far can you boot to at the moment? Can you login despite the errors, or will it not even make it to the login screen at all?
 
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It may be a good time to invest in a Network Adapter which will be fully compatible with Win 10. A good network connection is essential for the items you mention to function. If you download is very slow or being corrupted you may continue to have problems no matter what.
 
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Hi Ben,

I could be mistaken but my guess is a Recovery Disk made after the troubles began means that disk will contain back ups of potentially corrupted Windows system files and / or corrupted Registry entries. That may make this not very useful for the time being.

If you made the Recovery Disk from another computer then you may be able to extract some files from it in isolation, but the System settings saved in the creation of the disk will not work on your computer as they are unique to the computer the Disk was created on.

Regarding your Windows ISO you downloaded, did you end up with Install.wim, or Install.esd?

If the ISO file you downloaded is on your computer still and you can access it:
  • Right-click | select mount
  • Open the Sources folder
  • Look for Install file | is it Install.wim, or Install.esd

Regarding your computer; how far can you boot to at the moment? Can you login despite the errors, or will it not even make it to the login screen at all?

Most likely a good guess but: while making the RD, the computer was doing some heavy internet access making me presume that it was downloading files to include in the RD.

If memory serves correctly, one has .esd and another has .wim; neither works.

At present, I am using it to post this reply. I just finished playing chess and doing secondary email triage on it. What will not work: any and all repair functions built into Windows. Only Windows Defender updates work.
 
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It may be a good time to invest in a Network Adapter which will be fully compatible with Win 10. A good network connection is essential for the items you mention to function. If you download is very slow or being corrupted you may continue to have problems no matter what.

My wireless connection is nominally 4/1mb, shooting half a mile los over a river, through two groves of trees and through a brick court house,. Its running about 3.5 now, drops when the trees leaf out and in high humidity. This computer has small slots/case clearance, not possible to install the only other NIC i have. [BroadcomNetXtreme 57XX is built into the Mother Board.] My neighbor has aluminum siding and her router is on the other side of her house, so tapping it is difficult and impossible if she parks in front of the window.
 

Regedit32

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Most likely a good guess but: while making the RD, the computer was doing some heavy internet access making me presume that it was downloading files to include in the RD.

If memory serves correctly, one has .esd and another has .wim; neither works.

At present, I am using it to post this reply. I just finished playing chess and doing secondary email triage on it. What will not work: any and all repair functions built into Windows. Only Windows Defender updates work.

Hi Ben,

When you do a upgrade to Windows 10, or attempt to re-install it, the initial process does indeed go online to check for any recent updates that are downloaded to the Temporary Internet Files folder and made use of during the installation to ensure your fresh install is completely up to date when you eventually return to the Desktop.

From what you are saying it seems when you created those Disks using the Media Creation Tool somehow the burns were corrupted, or possibly you downloaded a Windows 10 ISO image with the wrong architecture for your system (i.e. there is a 32-bit version, and also a 64-bit version), or possibly you grabbed the wrong Product language version for your operating system.

I myself have found burning Disks a bit of a chore and not always successful; but that I suspect is because of a poor DVD Disk Writer that came with my computer which I've not got around to upgrading to a better quality one. So I tend to lean more towards mounting ISO images as a virtual drive rather than burn disks.

From the Desktop a simple Click Start | Settings | System | About (in the left pane) opens a window that displays your information including your System type which tells you whether its 32-bit or 64-bit OS.

If you don't mind doing another 4GB download (make sure your ISP is not going to cap you for excessive data use first), then you could have a go doing an In-place Upgrade of the Windows 10.

I've done this myself after having multiple issues with Windows Store, Mail App, and the now infamous Left-clicking Start gets you no where, and found it worked perfectly. The whole process to me roughly 1 hour 45 minutes, to download the ISO image, then mount it and run the In-place upgrade, choosing to save files that I did not want to lose.

This is how I did that:
  • I downloaded the Windows 10 ISO image from here:
    https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/software-download/techbench

  • On that page I ignored the Download link at top of page and scrolled down to the bottom of page where I did the following:
    • Selected my edition - I chose Windows 10, then clicked the Confirm button
    • Next I Selected Product language - I chose International English, then clicked the Confirm button
    • Finally I clicked the 64-bit download which for my computer was the correct option

      This automatically downloaded to my Downloads folder but as its a big download it took a while
  • Once it was downloaded I went to the Download folder where:
    Win10_1511_1_EnglishInternational_x64.iso was saved to.

  • I right-clicked that file and selected Mount
Then I clicked the Setup file that was listed in the window that initially opens when you mount the ISO

Note: I did the above logged in with Administrator privileges

Before I did all of the above, I took a look at a website to that has a useful graphical article on this process so I could make sure I knew what screens I ought to be seeing as the In-place upgrade took place, and in particular which option to pick to save the important files and settings I wanted to keep.

That article is located here: https://neosmart.net/wiki/windows-10-repair-installation/

  • You'll need to scroll down that page a little to get to the Windows 10 Repair Installation article but its worth a look if you are not familiar with the process (although I get the impression you are) so feel free to ignore this if you want to just get on with the above steps.)

I hope you can manage to resolve your issue.

As the installation creates a lot of temporary files, before doing all the above, given you have all ready made a few attempts it may be worth doing a clean up of temporary files on your System, as the Windows Install could halt and corrupt if there is insufficient space on your Hard Drive for it to unpack its temp files to as it installs.

Regards,

Regedit32
 
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Hi Ben,

When you do a upgrade to Windows 10, or attempt to re-install it, the initial process does indeed go online to check for any recent updates that are downloaded to the Temporary Internet Files folder and made use of during the installation to ensure your fresh install is completely up to date when you eventually return to the Desktop.

From what you are saying it seems when you created those Disks using the Media Creation Tool somehow the burns were corrupted, or possibly you downloaded a Windows 10 ISO image with the wrong architecture for your system (i.e. there is a 32-bit version, and also a 64-bit version), or possibly you grabbed the wrong Product language version for your operating system.

I myself have found burning Disks a bit of a chore and not always successful; but that I suspect is because of a poor DVD Disk Writer that came with my computer which I've not got around to upgrading to a better quality one. So I tend to lean more towards mounting ISO images as a virtual drive rather than burn disks.

From the Desktop a simple Click Start | Settings | System | About (in the left pane) opens a window that displays your information including your System type which tells you whether its 32-bit or 64-bit OS.

If you don't mind doing another 4GB download (make sure your ISP is not going to cap you for excessive data use first), then you could have a go doing an In-place Upgrade of the Windows 10.

I've done this myself after having multiple issues with Windows Store, Mail App, and the now infamous Left-clicking Start gets you no where, and found it worked perfectly. The whole process to me roughly 1 hour 45 minutes, to download the ISO image, then mount it and run the In-place upgrade, choosing to save files that I did not want to lose.

This is how I did that:
  • I downloaded the Windows 10 ISO image from here:
    https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/software-download/techbench

  • On that page I ignored the Download link at top of page and scrolled down to the bottom of page where I did the following:
    • Selected my edition - I chose Windows 10, then clicked the Confirm button
    • Next I Selected Product language - I chose International English, then clicked the Confirm button
    • Finally I clicked the 64-bit download which for my computer was the correct option

      This automatically downloaded to my Downloads folder but as its a big download it took a while
  • Once it was downloaded I went to the Download folder where:
    Win10_1511_1_EnglishInternational_x64.iso was saved to.

  • I right-clicked that file and selected Mount
Then I clicked the Setup file that was listed in the window that initially opens when you mount the ISO

Note: I did the above logged in with Administrator privileges

Before I did all of the above, I took a look at a website to that has a useful graphical article on this process so I could make sure I knew what screens I ought to be seeing as the In-place upgrade took place, and in particular which option to pick to save the important files and settings I wanted to keep.

That article is located here: https://neosmart.net/wiki/windows-10-repair-installation/

  • You'll need to scroll down that page a little to get to the Windows 10 Repair Installation article but its worth a look if you are not familiar with the process (although I get the impression you are) so feel free to ignore this if you want to just get on with the above steps.)

I hope you can manage to resolve your issue.

As the installation creates a lot of temporary files, before doing all the above, given you have all ready made a few attempts it may be worth doing a clean up of temporary files on your System, as the Windows Install could halt and corrupt if there is insufficient space on your Hard Drive for it to unpack its temp files to as it installs.

Regards,

Regedit32

Thanks for the reply, Rogerdit.

My system is dual core 64. Initially W7 set up for GB and I went through Hell trying to change it to US English kbd :( :(

When ISOs, I was very careful to select US English and 64 bit.

One of them is on my internal HD and fails to install whenever I try it. One is on an external HD which I have not been able to access for a week. One is on a usb stick and always fails.

Tonight I tried this:
Dism /Image:C:\offline /Cleanup-Image /RestoreHealth /Source:F:\sources/Reconstruct.WIM

and got back Error 2: unable to access the folder. I tried moving it to the HD with the same result.
 

Regedit32

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Dism /Image:C:\offline /Cleanup-Image /RestoreHealth /Source:F:\sources/Reconstruct.WIM

and got back Error 2: unable to access the folder. I tried moving it to the HD with the same result.

Hi Ben,

You have me scratching my head as I have not come across a Reconstruct.wim file in my own ISO downloads.

If indeed your ISO download is the same as mine that may explain the error 2 message you are getting.

Depending on what you did with your Windows 10 ISO download you will either have an Install.esd, or Install.wim file to work with. If you used the Media Creation Tool then you will have Install.esd. If you just downloaded and saved the ISO to your computer then it'll be Install.wim

As you are attempting to repair your Image using the downloaded ISO file, I'd suggest making use of the Limitaccess flag so that during its attempt to repair from your ISO it does not default to Windows Update (which in your case may be corrupted - that is yet to be determined of course).

A couple of basic commands you can run from an elevated command prompt (i.e. Administrator: Command Prompt) accessed via Winkey + X | then pressing A would be to do some simple scans to see if any of your Image is corrupted and then whether those corruptions are all ready marked in your Windows Registry. To do that you'd enter the following commands at the Elevated Command Prompt:

Code:
Dism /Online /Cleanup-Image /ScanHealth

This one scans for corruptions of the image.

Code:
Dism /Online /Cleanup-Image /CheckHealth

This one does a few things:
  • Checks whether any corruptions are marked in your Windows Registry
  • Reports back whether the scanned image is OK, Corrupted (but repairable), or Corrupted (not repairable)

Now that is important, because if the image is so corrupted it is beyond repair, then there is no point even trying to repair the image. You'd need to get rid of the image and start over with a clean install of Windows 10.

If it is repairable then I'd be making use of the downloaded ISO image by mounting it as I've described in previous posts, then opening an Elevated Command Prompt and entering the following command to try to repair it.

Code:
Dism /Online /Cleanup-Image /RestoreHealth /Source:wim:F:\sources\install.wim:1 /limitaccess

The /limitaccess flag will prevent the attempt to /RestoreHealth (i.e. repair the corrupt image) from making use of your Windows Update to get bits to repair the image with. At this stage you simply want to use the ISO you just invested 4GB of data downloading.

After this above command to restore health is executed and has completed you then need to from the same Elevated Command Prompt run a System File Check by entering SFC / SCANNOW at the prompt and pressing Enter key

The whole point of repairing the Image is to enable your system to use its built in utilities to repair other corruptions on the System that if left unresolved could eventually re-corrupt your Windows Image.

All going well you'll get a nice message saying Corrupted files were found and repaired, or something to that affect.

Hopefully this all makes sense to you.

Report back if you have any questions. Let me know how you go.

Regards,

Regedit32
 
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Reconstruct.wim is only in the RD. The ISO has a.esd file.

major problem: DISM will not rum. Err 193 &1 is not a valid windows application.
 
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DISM will not rum. Err 193 &1 is not a valid windows application.

Hi Ben,

A lot of people seem to be getting that error message including Windows 7, 8 and 8.1 users.

This error can occur if the DISM.exe has been corrupted, but more typically it will occur when a series of DLL files that the DISM will call on during the process of accessing the Install.wim or Install.esd file, have either become corrupted, or are missing altogether from the location they belong in. (Why they end up missing completely is not known to me).

Normally running SFC /SCANNOW from an elevated command prompt would resolve this issue automatically, but in your case you are facing a situation where you cannot reply on the System File Checker to do its job; hence the use of DISM to first try to refresh your Windows Image in order that System File Checker can run properly.

So we find ourselves in a catch-22 where to run DISM commands you need SFC to work, but to get SFC to work you need DISM to work.

As I said though this is the most common reason for that Error 193 %1 non valid windows32 scenario.

As you still can access your Desktop you could take a look at the DLLS location to see whether my guess is indeed accurate.
  • Open File Explorer
  • Navigate to this location: C:\Windows\System32\downlevel
  • Typically you'd see 95 files there (although that may vary depending on which version you have Home, Pro etcetera.)
  • The DLLS that can mysteriously disappear but actually need to be there are as listed in the image below. If they are present its quite likely one or more of them are corrupted and need repairing:

Service DLLs.png


Do these files exist in your downlevel folder?

Are you aware of any logs you have that have pointed to these files being corrupted?

Please report back on that.

Now in the meanwhile, if they are actually missing completely, then you could copy these files from a Windows 10 OS of equivalent build and architecture (i.e. If your system is Windows 10 Profession, 64-bit, Build 10586.218, then the computer you copy from must be the same Windows edition, same 64-bit architecture, same Build #) to your downlevel folder.

If on the other hand they are corrupted, they really need to be repaired as simply copying a replacement file there would not guarantee that whatever corrupted them will not just corrupt the replacements. In that event you really are facing the strong likelihood of needing to do an In-place upgrade, or having to take the worse option a completely clean install of Windows 10.

If you have not all ready done so, I'd recommend saving any important files and noting down specific settings you like to use for your Apps because if we ultimately end up doing a Clean Install that information will be lost during the installation process.

Regards,

Regedit32
 
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In the family, I have a similar machine working great with Windows 10. Just a little marginal on specs.
I believe Dell do have a fairly recent driver for your Network Adapter, but have a look here:
http://www.driverscape.com/download/broadcom-netxtreme-57xx-gigabit-controllerI
Try this:

Shutdown your computer, power it back up and press the key you need to get to your BIOS.
Check your BIOS for a setting called any of these below and, if you find one of them, set it to ENABLED.
"Non-Execute Memory Protection"
"Data Execution Prevention"
"No Execute Memory Protection"
"Execute Disable Function" with a sub-menu of 'No-Execute Page Protection Technology."

It is possible, according to the Bios date, that you do not have any of those.

If you are successful, it may solve several of the problems you are having
 

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Thanks Dave,

I've been hoping someone more familiar with the Dell specs would notice this thread.

Ben has been trying pretty hard to sort his issues, but each turn we take a new cryptic error pops up.

It'd be great if those built in Dell utilities with some tweaks can get him back up and running.

Regards,

Regedit32
 
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Hi Ben,

A lot of people seem to be getting that error message including Windows 7, 8 and 8.1 users.

This error can occur if the DISM.exe has been corrupted, but more typically it will occur when a series of DLL files that the DISM will call on during the process of accessing the Install.wim or Install.esd file, have either become corrupted, or are missing altogether from the location they belong in. (Why they end up missing completely is not known to me).

Normally running SFC /SCANNOW from an elevated command prompt would resolve this issue automatically, but in your case you are facing a situation where you cannot reply on the System File Checker to do its job; hence the use of DISM to first try to refresh your Windows Image in order that System File Checker can run properly.

So we find ourselves in a catch-22 where to run DISM commands you need SFC to work, but to get SFC to work you need DISM to work.

As I said though this is the most common reason for that Error 193 %1 non valid windows32 scenario.

As you still can access your Desktop you could take a look at the DLLS location to see whether my guess is indeed accurate.
  • Open File Explorer
  • Navigate to this location: C:\Windows\System32\downlevel
  • Typically you'd see 95 files there (although that may vary depending on which version you have Home, Pro etcetera.)
  • The DLLS that can mysteriously disappear but actually need to be there are as listed in the image below. If they are present its quite likely one or more of them are corrupted and need repairing:

View attachment 2830

Do these files exist in your downlevel folder?

Are you aware of any logs you have that have pointed to these files being corrupted?

Please report back on that.

Now in the meanwhile, if they are actually missing completely, then you could copy these files from a Windows 10 OS of equivalent build and architecture (i.e. If your system is Windows 10 Profession, 64-bit, Build 10586.218, then the computer you copy from must be the same Windows edition, same 64-bit architecture, same Build #) to your downlevel folder.

If on the other hand they are corrupted, they really need to be repaired as simply copying a replacement file there would not guarantee that whatever corrupted them will not just corrupt the replacements. In that event you really are facing the strong likelihood of needing to do an In-place upgrade, or having to take the worse option a completely clean install of Windows 10.

If you have not all ready done so, I'd recommend saving any important files and noting down specific settings you like to use for your Apps because if we ultimately end up doing a Clean Install that information will be lost during the installation process.

Regards,

Regedit32

Thanks, regedit.
The folder contains 95 files, 109MB. The files you listed are present. I do not have a log file other than the one I will try to upload. Setup.exe quits and goes home without installing. The forum will not let me upload CBS.zip.
 
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Thanks Dave,

I've been hoping someone more familiar with the Dell specs would notice this thread.

Ben has been trying pretty hard to sort his issues, but each turn we take a new cryptic error pops up.

It'd be great if those built in Dell utilities with some tweaks can get him back up and running.

Regards,

Regedit32
Well, It is a shot in the dark, in fact. Frankly I think Ben has a very poor upgrade. Something went very wrong at the beginning. With the faults listed in the first post, it looks like nothing has gone in correctly.
But, Ben, I would urgently suggest you overcome the problem with reading the key.
Go to the Dell page:
http://www.dell.com/support/home/us/en/04

They will automatically detect your computer. Make a note of the very important service tag, which Dell will then show you. Once on the page, you can be directed to the driver download section. If you, there, select MS 2000 as you operating system, you should find some useable drivers.

As you haven't mentioned it, I guess you have deleted the factory restore hidden partition?

If you think it is still there, on a boot up, hold the CTRL +F12 keys, or, if that does not work, just the F12 key. That will bring you into the factory restore menu. As you probably know, this will put the computer back to its original condition, as purchased. Unfortunately, there is a catch there. On that machine, the original is XP, which is not upgradeable to Windows 10 (for free).
 
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Well, It is a shot in the dark, in fact. Frankly I think Ben has a very poor upgrade. Something went very wrong at the beginning. With the faults listed in the first post, it looks like nothing has gone in correctly.
But, Ben, I would urgently suggest you overcome the problem with reading the key.
Go to the Dell page:
http://www.dell.com/support/home/us/en/04

They will automatically detect your computer. Make a note of the very important service tag, which Dell will then show you. Once on the page, you can be directed to the driver download section. If you, there, select MS 2000 as you operating system, you should find some useable drivers.

Dell suggested calling their technician, with the possibility of remote operations. I suspect that will involve $$$ 'cuz, unknown to me, this thing was 7 years old when I got it, outta warranty. [Refurbished from Micomp, they put W7 on it.]
 
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With the Dell links I gave you, there is no warranty involved. It is all "do it yourself"
 
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I am sorry, But there does seem to be a loss in communication here. I did not mention the diagnostics. The second link allows you to choose your OS. One thought, I presume the upgrade was Home to Home or, Pro to pro?
 

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