Restore Function Creating a Black Screen of Death and Error 0x80070091.....


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A couple of weeks ago I did a Restart and got a message Windows has not loaded. So, I did a Restore and got the black screen of death, and the error 0x80070091. I put the error number into a good search engine and got the following below. Microsoft has owned up to this glitch, but the solution they presented didn't work.

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From the answers.microsoft Forum.....

answers.microsoft.com

System Restore error 0x80070091

Jestoni Mac asked on March 17, 2017
Microsoft

Microsoft has identified an issue in Windows 10 where System Restore will fail to complete and will generate the following error:

Details:
System Restore failed while restoring the directory from the restore point.
Source: AppxStaging
Destination: %ProgramFiles%\WindowsApps
An unspecified error occurred during System Restore. (0x80070091)

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Answer

Harold Fra replied on March 17, 2017
Microsoft

Updated (3/21/17)

Hi Jestoni,

We are currently investigating the issue and will update this thread when we have more information.

Advanced users can resolve the problem by trying one of the two options listed below:

Option 1: Rename the WindowsApps folder in Safe Mode

1. Boot into Safe Mode.
2. Right click on Start and click on Command Prompt (admin).
3. Type these commands below one by one.

• cd C:\Program Files
• takeown /f WindowsApps /r /d Y
• icacls WindowsApps /grant “%USERDOMAIN%\%USERNAME%”:(F) /t
• attrib WindowsApps -h
• rename WindowsApps WindowsApps.old
4. Reboot back into Windows.
5. Run System Restore.

Option 2: Rename the WindowsApps folder from the Windows Recovery Environment (WinRE)

1.Boot into WinRE. To do this, click Start > Settings > Update & security > Recovery. Then under Advanced startup, click Restart now.

2.Click Troubleshoot > Advanced Options > Command Prompt. Enter your administrator password when prompted.

3.Type these commands, one by one: ◦cd C:\Program Files
◦attrib WindowsApps -h
◦rename WindowsApps WindowsAppsOld

4.Reboot Windows.

5.Run System Restore.

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I can't get to Safe mode for whatever reason and perform Option 1, but I can get into the Advanced Restart and Command Prompt screen for Option 2.

Typed in the first line, "cd C:\Program Files" but got nothing except, "Cannot find file path" or words to that effect.

Got any suggestions?
 
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My System....

HP Z220 Workstation,
ST500 DM002-1BD12 Hard Drive
Intel i3, 3.30 GHz
12Gb RAM
Intel Graphics HD
Win10 Pro, 64 bit
HP 19" widescreen

AND, using Windows Defender.....
 

Trouble

Noob Whisperer
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I cannot confirm that any of the information contained in your resource is accurate or will help with your problem, but.....

It is not atypical for your drives / partitions to enumerate differently than normal when booting external to the OS (DVD or ThumbDrive, etc.,)
At the command prompt you may need to do some hunting and pecking to determine which drive contains your Windows installation / "Program Files" location.
Typically when booting from an external resource you will be at that sources boot directory, something like X:\ or X:\Sources or similar
At the command prompt, simply start your search for the correct drive / partition by typing
C:
hit enter
then type
dir
hit enter
look at the directories contained on the "C" drive as it is seen by your current boot mechanism and see if it contains a "Windows" and or "Program Files" directory.
IF not then advance through the alphabet
D:
hit enter
dir
hit enter
E:
hit enter
dir
hit enter
 
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OK, followed the steps you offered and found the Program Files under the D:\ drive. And, so the next step is? Please and thank you?

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Just an FYI, here's the URL of the conversation about error 0x80070091, which I posted earlier, where you can easily verify it's veracity. It's taken directly from the answers.microsoft (dot) com website.....

https://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/forum/windows_10-update/system-restore-error-0x80070091/cedb6d6a-a3cf-4917-a6c0-a1544631adb6
 
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Found all my folders through other sources. Didn't fully understand my PC wasn't going to be up and running in a timely manner, that it was going to take all this effort and research. And, in the end, my hard drive is going to need to be wiped and whatever OS I decide to replace Win10 with then installed, and all the folders and files put back into my PC.

I was naïve about how fixing this BSOD was going to work until someone recently explained the situation to me clearly, point by point. I just had no idea.

So, I'm going to call a home service computer repair tech company and let them do all this exporting, and importing, and wiping, and reinstalling. I don't have the wherewithal or desire to continue doing all this time-consuming hunting and pecking for solutions. I'll just pay the money, and let the pros do it.
 
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Trouble

Noob Whisperer
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I'll just pay the money, and let the pros do it.
Sorry to hear that but sometimes that's all we're left with.
As a fellow Hossier I wish there were more that I could do to help :(

Take your time and shop around for a suitable "Pro". Check on line and see if they have some good reviews / testimonials.
Try to avoid the big box stores if possible and look toward mom and pop establishments close to you.
AND let us know how things work out.

However you decide to proceed, you might want to take this opportunity to research some good disk imaging software
https://www.windows10forums.com/threads/please-for-your-own-peace-of-mind.794/

It's always a good idea to have a known good, viable disk image at hand (no matter the OS) so you always have a strong fall-back position to recover to, in the event of anything like this happening again.
 

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