Verification code input problem


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My Windows HDD crashed and Windows 10 would not boot.
I could not use any Rescue /reset options because I had no way to create a boot disk, or any restore point since the original Windows10 upgrade fried my MOBO.
Nobody sells computers with OS disks disk. Any software disks.
All I found usable was the Boot/Rescue USB I created when I first started my new computer Windows 8.
I was able to reinstall the original Windows 8 OS and have it activated without problem, but of course that wiped my whole disk clean.

The problem is when a verification code was mailed to me I am not able to enter it whole.
The Windows 8 verification form's code input field is limited to 6 digits.
Codes sent are 7 digits.
It would be a simple editing fix to change the input box length from 6 to 7 on the form.
Would you, please, pass this on the tech who could do that?
Thank you for your help in advance.
 
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Regedit32

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In Windows 8, if I recall accurately, you open PC Settings, then select Accounts, then:
  • On left pane select your Account
  • Then on right pane click the hyperlinked: Verify
  • Now enter your password and click OK
  • Now you should see a dialog where you select how to receive your code.

    In your case you have that code so just click the hyperlinked: I have a code

  • Now copy & paste your code, or type it into the field. The field should be large enough to accept a 7 digit one.
  • Click Submit and that should be done instantly
 

Regedit32

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Also, if I recall, using the same steps, I'm fairly certain Microsoft can also send you a complete Product Key too for recovery purposes.
 
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I am guessing that the Microsoft computer Dbase has your Email/verification, listed now as Windows 10. Could be, also, why you received that 7 letter code.
 
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In Windows 8, if I recall accurately, you open PC Settings, then select Accounts, then:
  • On left pane select your Account
  • Then on right pane click the hyperlinked: Verify
  • Now enter your password and click OK
  • Now you should see a dialog where you select how to receive your code.

    In your case you have that code so just click the hyperlinked: I have a code

  • Now copy & paste your code, or type it into the field.
  • I am guessing that the Microsoft computer Dbase has your Email/verification, listed now as Windows 10. Could be, also, why you received that 7 letter code.
    Thank you for your reply. That has crossed my mind that it is actually windows 10 verification code..
  • The Windows 8 is the original OEM OS that I have managed to finally ot upgrade to Windows 8.1 and then Windows 10.
  • MS gave me new product numbers, and my Windows was Activated but then they would not they would not acknowlege after MOBO replacement.
  • Same OS same HDD.
  • So again I am screwed by MS as owuld have to purchase Windows 10. Can't upgrade my 8.
  • Now I can not even enter the verifivation code - so knowledge still dopes not get me there.
  • I will try the click on the hyperlink although I will not be able to enter it whole.
  • Thank you regardless.
  • Tony
  • Click Submit and that should be done instantly
 

Regedit32

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As you've had to replace your Motherboard, the previous Digital license you had for Windows 10 will not recognize your machine.

See this Microsoft article, explaining your options: https://support.microsoft.com/en-nz/help/10738

Technically, they could require you to purchase a new license, however, Microsoft are known to be lenient at times, so it's well worth following their advice on this page, as you may be able to transfer your original license to your new motherboard/Computer hardware setup, without needing to buy a license.

Some years ago, back in Windows Vista days, I had a catastrophic failure of my power supply that also destroyed my motherboard and various cards connected to it. In those days, you could ring a free phone number for Microsoft. Not only did they give me a brand you product key for free to install Windows on my new computer, but they also posted for free, a pair of Windows Vista Ultimate DVDs. This allowed me to upgrade from Vista Home to Ultimate for free.

To this day I'm not sure why they did that. Maybe it was a gesture of kindness for being a long time Windows User, or maybe it was just a policy they had in place at the time, but you ought to contact them if you can, and try your luck.
 
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My Windows HDD crashed and Windows 10 would not boot.
I could not use any Rescue /reset options because I had no way to create a boot disk
You should have made a NEW Windows 10 Boot USB or DVD. when you updated/upgraded to Windows 10.
1576012666737.png


There are many programs which will allow you to BOOT and FIX your Crashed OS. 1st you have to make the BOOTABLE USB or DVD before you CRASH.... since you have already did a Windows 8.1 Restore more than likey almost all you Windows 10 stuff has been overwritten and therefore mostly retrievalable . Programs can assist in BOOT to FIX a crashed OS
1. Acronis
2. Paragon HardDisk Manager
3. Macrium Reflect
4. Sergei Bootable PE
5. Gandaulf Bootable PE
6. Microsoft also let you make a Bootable PE to assist in fixing your Crashed OS.
7. All current Windows 10 OSs legit have a Cloud Activation Reset. All you need to do is reinstall a same version of Windows 10.
you also should make a BOOTABLE USB or DVD and then learn the BCDEDIT as detail by MS on how to FIX CRASHED OS that is NON Bootable.

Mar 09, 17

How To Rebuild the BCD in Windows

Rebuilding the BCD in Windows should only take around 15 minutes and, while it isn't the easiest thing you'll ever do, it's too tough either, especially if you stick to the directions below.

1.) Start Advanced Startup Options if you're using Windows 10 or Windows 8. See How to Access Advanced Startup Options if you're not sure how to do that.

Start System Recovery Options if you're using Windows 7 or Windows Vista. See the How To Access the System Recovery Options Menu section in that link I just gave you for help if this is your first time using the menu.

2.) Open Command Prompt from Advanced Startup Options or System Recovery Options menu.

Note: The Command Prompt available from these diagnostic menus is very similar to the one you may be familiar with within Windows. Also, the following procedure should work identically in Windows 10, 8, 7, and Vista.
At the prompt, type the bootrec command as shown below and then press Enter:

3.) bootrec /rebuildbcd

The bootrec command will search for Windows installations not included in the Boot Configuration Data and then ask you if you'd like to add one or more to it.

4.) You should see one of the following messages at the command line.
Option 1

Scanning all disks for Windows installations.

Please wait, since this may take a while...

Successfully scanned Windows installations.
Total identified Windows installations: 0
The operation completed successfully.

Option 2

Scanning all disks for Windows installations.

Please wait, since this may take a while...

Successfully scanned Windows installations.
Total identified Windows installations: 1
[1] D:\Windows
Add installation to boot list? Yes<Y>/No<N>/All<A>:

If you see:

Option 1: Move on to Step 5. This result most likely means that Windows installation data in the BCD store exists but bootrec couldn't find any additional installations of Windows on your computer to add to the BCD. That's fine, you'll just need to take a few extra steps to rebuild the BCD.

Option 2: Enter Y or Yes to the Add installation to boot list? question, after which you should see a The operation completed successfully message, followed by a blinking cursor at the prompt. Finish up with Step 10 toward the bottom of the page.


5.) Since the BCD store exists and lists a Windows installation, you'll first have to "remove" it manually and then try to rebuild it again.

At the prompt, execute the bcdedit command as shown and then press Enter:

bcdedit /export c:\bcdbackup

The bcdedit command is used here to export the BCD store as a file: bcdbackup. There's no need to specify a file extension.

The command should return the following on screen:

The operation completed successfully.

meaning the BCD export worked as expected.

6.)At this point, you need to adjust several file attributes for the BCD store so you can manipulate it.

At the prompt, execute the attrib command exactly like this:

attrib c:\boot\bcd -h -r -s

What you just did with the attrib command was remove the hidden, read-only, and system attributes from the file bcd. Those attributes restricted the actions you could take on the file. Now that they're gone, you can manipulate the file more freely - specifically, rename it.

7.) To rename the BCD store, execute the ren command as shown:

ren c:\boot\bcd bcd.old

Now that the BCD store is renamed, you should now be able to successfully rebuild it, as you tried to do in Step 3.

Note: You could delete the BCD file entirely since you're about to create a new one. However, renaming the existing BCD accomplishes the same thing since it's now unavailable to Windows, plus provides you yet another layer of backup, in addition to the export you did in Step 5 if you decide to undo your actions.

8.) Try rebuilding the BCD again by executing the following, followed by Enter:

bootrec /rebuildbcd

which should produce this in the Command Prompt window:

Scanning all disks for Windows installations.

Please wait, since this may take a while...

Successfully scanned Windows installations.
Total identified Windows installations: 1
[1] D:\Windows
Add installation to boot list? Yes<Y>/No<N>/All<A>:

meaning that the BCD store rebuild is progressing as expected.

9.) At the Add installation to boot list? question, type Enter Y or Yes, followed by the Enter key.

You should see this on screen:

The operation completed successfully.

meaning that the BCD rebuild is complete.

10.) Restart your computer.

Assuming that an issue with the BCD store was the only problem, Windows should start as expected.

If not, continue to troubleshoot whatever specific issue you're seeing that's preventing Windows from booting normally.

Important: Depending on how you started Advanced Startup Options or System Recovery Options, you may need to remove a disc or flash drive before restarting.
 

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