Disabling Automatic Startup Repair on Windows 10?


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So, I've been having to deal with this problem about two times now. I had no choice but to wipe, however fortunately, I was able to backup all my files before wiping. My second time occurred today, with no choice but to wipe either.

Anyways, I was wondering if there's any fix to this? None of the command prompt commands seemed to work when I was trying to fix it back then either, which is kind of a let down. Hopefully they work now that I have access again though.
 
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As far as I know there is no way to stop the Automatic repair from starting if it sees a problem. You can control the process if you use boot media which has the repair tools so you can pick what to use.

You don't give any indication of what you problem might be so I assume you don't have any symptoms which might point you to a resolution?
 

Regedit32

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Hi Kaito,

You can make use of Windows built in bcdedit utility to prevent the automatic startup repairs.
  • Right-click on Start then left-click on Command Prompt (Admin)
  • In the Administrator: Command Prompt window that opens type the following:

    bcdedit /set recoveryenabled no

    Press Enter key to execute

  • This will disabled the automatic startup repair

    Note: This really is not a good idea in my opinion, however at times it can be useful to resolve an issue, or to prevent a looped repair cycle.

  • To re-enable the automatic startup repair once you resolve you issue, repeat steps above but type:

    bcdedit /set recoveryenabled yes

    Press Enter key to execute

    Note: You can confirm your change by typing bcdedit then pressing Enter key to display current settings; one of which of course is the recoveryenabled and will either say no or yes for its current state.
Regards,

Regedit32
 
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As far as I know there is no way to stop the Automatic repair from starting if it sees a problem. You can control the process if you use boot media which has the repair tools so you can pick what to use.

You don't give any indication of what you problem might be so I assume you don't have any symptoms which might point you to a resolution?
There has been no resolution other than doing a clean wipe from what I can see, however thanks to @Regedit32 I should have been able to disable it. This has happened about two times now, and even though I have backed up previously, the same issue seemed to have occur.

For the record, I don't turn my desktop regularly as one normally would, but perhaps this is a wake-up call.

@Regedit32 I tried doing the same command line back when I was having the problem yesterday, with the command prompt option that the automatic repair tool gave, and it still didn't seem to work during that time either. Is there a difference between back when I did it and now?
 

Regedit32

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For the record, I don't turn my desktop regularly as one normally would, but perhaps this is a wake-up call.

If you're not using the Desktop a lot part of your problem may simply be that you are as a result ending up in a situation where several updates via Windows Update Service are coming at once, some of which do require a restart to install correctly.

That was why I previously mentioned I do not recommend disabling automatic repair mode as when things go wrong you do want that feature in place.

For example, recently Microsoft release an update then within a few weeks withdrew that update and released a repaired version of it as it was bugged. Imagine now the scenario where because you have not been online with the Desktop to update that you end up with both the Bugged update and its replacement both fighting to install themselves at the same time.

Would like some more input on this.

At this point in time what follow up are you wanting precisely?
 
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If you're not using the Desktop a lot part of your problem may simply be that you are as a result ending up in a situation where several updates via Windows Update Service are coming at once, some of which do require a restart to install correctly.

That was why I previously mentioned I do not recommend disabling automatic repair mode as when things go wrong you do want that feature in place.

For example, recently Microsoft release an update then within a few weeks withdrew that update and released a repaired version of it as it was bugged. Imagine now the scenario where because you have not been online with the Desktop to update that you end up with both the Bugged update and its replacement both fighting to install themselves at the same time.

The thing is, I'm pretty sure my computer got bricked while it was trying to install an update, which I'm not sure how, since when I just opened the screen of my computer, it showed the repair tool thing.

When it happened, I formatted my C drive, and then added all my previous files back to the drive after the format.

I have done a chkdsk, system file check scan, and all of them have reported to no problems.

Back in February, I installed an extra drive, April was the first time I've had this problem, and then now, May, I've had the problem again two days ago.
 

Regedit32

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@Regedit32 I tried doing the same command line back when I was having the problem yesterday, with the command prompt option that the automatic repair tool gave, and it still didn't seem to work during that time either. Is there a difference between back when I did it and now?[/QUOTE]

Hi Kaito,

There is no point disabling automatic repair once its all ready been triggered.

That action I gave you via bcdedit is one you need to do when computer is functioning and you are logged on.

i.e. You need to set this so the next time a fault occurs that would normally trigger the automatic repair, when the trigger takes place it will read the BCD and see its not available, and thus will continue to boot even though a fault was detected. Whether you then successfully get to login page and then Desktop - only time will tell.
 

Regedit32

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When you are logged on to Desktop you might want to take a look at the Windows Event Viewer by right-clicking on Start > selecting Event Viewer

Take a look at the logs looking specifically around the time one of these automatic repairs was triggered to see if you can isolate what is triggering it and get more information on the issue.
 
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@Regedit32 I tried doing the same command line back when I was having the problem yesterday, with the command prompt option that the automatic repair tool gave, and it still didn't seem to work during that time either. Is there a difference between back when I did it and now?

Take a look at the logs looking specifically around the time one of these automatic repairs was triggered to see if you can isolate what is triggering it and get more information on the issue.
Alright, I see. Thanks for clarifying on that. Hopefully there's a work around to this as well, since I wouldn't want to create another problem for that either.

Also, would there be any idea as to why my computer would brick during an update? I disabled automatic updates for the time being, so it doesn't go to that state again, but is there any work-around for the time being?
 
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Regedit32

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Hi Kaito,

An online PC magazine, (I think you can buy it in a shop too) published a simple article back in November last year discussing steps to take to reduce the chances of a Windows Update crashing (or as you call it ' bricking ') during its install.

That article is here: http://pcsupport.about.com/od/system-security/a/prevent-windows-update-problems.htm

You may find that helpful to read.

Essentially though the most common reason you run into troubles:
  • Insufficient or Interrupted power supply
  • Insufficient spare space on Hard drive
  • The file itself was corrupted when downloaded (in that scenario you would be best to run Microsoft's troubleshooter to check your Windows Updater is actually not the problem. You can get that here:
    http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windows-10/windows-update-troubleshooter
  • Security programs running in background while you are downloading the update, or installing it. It's always a good idea to temporarily disable these programs while you are installing your Windows updates or installing Windows itself.
  • If you have a lot of updates to install and you are manually doing this (i.e. you chose to receive updates but not to have them automatically install themselves), sometimes it helps to choose to install one at a time, or just a few at a time, rather than all at once.

Regards,

Regedit32
 
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