Strange message during reinstall


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Where did you get the Media you are using to install Windows 10.
 
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can you disable TPM temporary while installing Win 10?
 
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Where did you get the Media you are using to install Windows 10.
The PC had to be turned in at the store a while back. The OS crashed, and it did not boot properly. They may have replaced the original OS on the installation partition on the disc, but I don’t know for sure.
 
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can you disable TPM temporary while installing Win 10?
I don’t know how? And will that help with the problem? Anyway, I don’t really know what the actual problem is, I just see this warning message, so I assume there is a problem I should resolve. Can anyone tell me why I get this message in the first place?
 
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The PC had to be turned in at the store a while back. The OS crashed, and it did not boot properly. They may have replaced the original OS on the installation partition on the disc, but I don’t know for sure.
Answer to original ? = yes

If you system has a boot issue, I recommend you get a Backup Program, such as 1.) Acronis, 2.)Macrium Reflect 3.) Paragon 4.) AOEMI
then make a FULL restorable Image, then if you crash, you insert a Bootable USB made by the Program and do a 100% Restore, inturn that restores all you files, and Boot Media. I use 3 personally and make a weekly full backup, on a external SSD. average time to make aFull mage is 3 to 5 min and average time to do a full restore is 5 to 7 min. also there is a command which if you learn it will assist you in restoreing the BOOT to proper... MS allows this from any Bootable Media. call bcdedit.
BCDEDIT from command prompt
How To Rebuild the BCD in Windows

Rebuilding the BCD in Windows should only take around 15 minutes and, while it isn't the easiest thing you'll ever do, it's too tough either, especially if you stick to the directions below.

1.) Start Advanced Startup Options if you're using Windows 10 or Windows 8. See How to Access Advanced Startup Options if you're not sure how to do that.

Start System Recovery Options if you're using Windows 7 or Windows Vista. See the How To Access the System Recovery Options Menu section in that link I just gave you for help if this is your first time using the menu.

2.) Open Command Prompt from Advanced Startup Options or System Recovery Options menu.

Note: The Command Prompt available from these diagnostic menus is very similar to the one you may be familiar with within Windows. Also, the following procedure should work identically in Windows 10, 8, 7, and Vista.
At the prompt, type the bootrec command as shown below and then press Enter:

3.) bootrec /rebuildbcd

The bootrec command will search for Windows installations not included in the Boot Configuration Data and then ask you if you'd like to add one or more to it.

4.) You should see one of the following messages at the command line.
Option 1

Scanning all disks for Windows installations.

Please wait, since this may take a while...

Successfully scanned Windows installations.
Total identified Windows installations: 0
The operation completed successfully.

Option 2

Scanning all disks for Windows installations.

Please wait, since this may take a while...

Successfully scanned Windows installations.
Total identified Windows installations: 1
[1] D:\Windows
Add installation to boot list? Yes<Y>/No<N>/All<A>:

If you see:

Option 1: Move on to Step 5. This result most likely means that Windows installation data in the BCD store exists but bootrec couldn't find any additional installations of Windows on your computer to add to the BCD. That's fine, you'll just need to take a few extra steps to rebuild the BCD.

Option 2: Enter Y or Yes to the Add installation to boot list? question, after which you should see a The operation completed successfully message, followed by a blinking cursor at the prompt. Finish up with Step 10 toward the bottom of the page.


5.) Since the BCD store exists and lists a Windows installation, you'll first have to "remove" it manually and then try to rebuild it again.

At the prompt, execute the bcdedit command as shown and then press Enter:

bcdedit /export c:\bcdbackup

The bcdedit command is used here to export the BCD store as a file: bcdbackup. There's no need to specify a file extension.

The command should return the following on screen:

The operation completed successfully.

meaning the BCD export worked as expected.

6.)At this point, you need to adjust several file attributes for the BCD store so you can manipulate it.

At the prompt, execute the attrib command exactly like this:

attrib c:\boot\bcd -h -r -s

What you just did with the attrib command was remove the hidden, read-only, and system attributes from the file bcd. Those attributes restricted the actions you could take on the file. Now that they're gone, you can manipulate the file more freely - specifically, rename it.

7.) To rename the BCD store, execute the ren command as shown:

ren c:\boot\bcd bcd.old

Now that the BCD store is renamed, you should now be able to successfully rebuild it, as you tried to do in Step 3.

Note: You could delete the BCD file entirely since you're about to create a new one. However, renaming the existing BCD accomplishes the same thing since it's now unavailable to Windows, plus provides you yet another layer of backup, in addition to the export you did in Step 5 if you decide to undo your actions.

8.) Try rebuilding the BCD again by executing the following, followed by Enter:

bootrec /rebuildbcd

which should produce this in the Command Prompt window:

Scanning all disks for Windows installations.

Please wait, since this may take a while...

Successfully scanned Windows installations.
Total identified Windows installations: 1
[1] D:\Windows
Add installation to boot list? Yes<Y>/No<N>/All<A>:

meaning that the BCD store rebuild is progressing as expected.

9.) At the Add installation to boot list? question, type Enter Y or Yes, followed by the Enter key.

You should see this on screen:

The operation completed successfully.

meaning that the BCD rebuild is complete.

10.) Restart your computer.

Assuming that an issue with the BCD store was the only problem, Windows should start as expected.

If not, continue to troubleshoot whatever specific issue you're seeing that's preventing Windows from booting normally.

Important: Depending on how you started Advanced Startup Options or System Recovery Options, you may need to remove a disc or flash drive before restarting.
 

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