WPD Privacy app for Windows


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Its not been used through a lot yet can give a simple outline


WPD is a portable tool to manage your Windows 10 privacy and firewall settings, uninstall Windows apps, and decide what apps can access your information. WPD enables you to disable Telemetry, Customer Experience Improvement, Advertising ID, Input Personalization, Cortana, OneDrive and other Windows features that have the potential to invade your privacy. If you're not sure about any tweaks, there's a question mark icon next to each setting so you can be sure what you're changing. There's also an option that allows you to remove anything from the Windows Store that came with Windows 10 including Xbox, Photos, Tips, Get Office, and more.

Core features:

Privacy management - Customize Group Policy, Services, Tasks and other settings responsible for data collection and transmission.
Firewall rules - Block telemetry IP's using firewall rules from the @crazy-max repository.
Appx uninstaller - Easy remove pre-installed Windows Store garbage or any other app.

WPD is comprised of three basic modules, Privacy, Blocker, and App uninstaller. Clicking the Privacy box brings up an extensive list of setting choices that extend over several pages. At the bottom of the list is a button that will allow disabling of all options, and a button to return to default values. There is a question mark to the right of every option which when clicked gives an explanation of the option.

The sidebar to the left allows navigation to the home page and the three modules of WPD.

The arrow icon is for the Home or opening screen.
The padlock icon is for the privacy module.
The shield icon is for the blocker.
The grid icon is for uninstalling Microsoft apps.

The Blocker module has sections for telemetry settings, Windows update, and Firewall rules.

Finally the Uninstaller allows removal of Windows store apps.

Do be aware that the changes made by WPD may not be permanent as any installed Windows updates may restore some or all settings back to those Microsoft deem as preferred?
 
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Yes, I had read what you posted before. Just wondered if anyone had any experience with WPD good or bad. I had wondered if disabling some of the options would hinder any performance cause problems....Thanks for your reply...Jim
 

Regedit32

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I have not used WPD, so cannot offer any informed opinion of that app.

All I can off is an opinion in general, when it comes to using third party applications to manage your Windows settings, installations, telemetry, etcetera.
  • I do not think I have ever seen one of these third party tools offer a single modification that you cannot do for yourself within the Windows environment. In my view people ought to invest time learning how to use Windows.
  • Generally speaking, most of these applications will make Registry modifications. While some are fine, in many cases the changes made are either:
    • Placed into the wrong Registry path and hive
    • Unnecessarily duplicated [ suggesting to me the person does not understand hierarchy at all ]
    • Deprecated! [ i.e. The tweak has become redundant because Microsoft has already modified the System to reject that tweak, or because the item being modified, is now located in an entirely different location in Windows, or renamed ].
  • I get people fear Big Brother seeing all they do, or hearing all they say. As a result people appear to want to block Telemetry in the Windows environment. The problem with the methods other applications use, is that they can result in Windows servers misidentifying your Windows edition, and that can result in the User not being offered Critical updates, that thus, can prevent the users computer functioning at optimum, but can also compromise its security altogether. Again, this over the years is almost certainly because of - a now well publicised - Registry tweak. Yes the tweak will halt some telemetry, but at the risk of what I allude to. Whether or not, WPD does this too I cannot confirm, as I have not tested it.

My biggest concern with these kind of tools, is it makes the User lazy! It's easy to make some tweaks and completely forget about them. After all, life is far to busy to be bothered managing your Windows OS as it was designed to be - isn't it!?

So the latest Windows update arrives, and guess what, a large part of the changes you made need to be done again. But will the lazy User even think about that, or will they just continue using their computer assuming all is as they set it up last month?

What if they do think to run their tool again? Will those same changes they used last month still work, or are there now some subtle changes in their new Windows 10 update that will either nullify their modifications, or worse, turn their modifications into a ticking time bomb that will cause them some serious grief with system crashes, application failures, or Security flaws that lead them into the dark world of being infected by some scum bags virus!

My advice - for what its worth - Make the time to learn about your operating system, and how it works. Learn how to using the tools Microsoft provide to modify your settings. If you're currently using a Windows 10 Home edition and want to make the most of these tools, be aware you may need to be willing to spend some money, and purchase a Windows 10 Professional edition. I think that type of investment is well worth the cost; but as I said - this is my opinion.

Regards,

Regedit32
 
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Joined
Nov 21, 2018
Messages
22
Reaction score
1
I have not used WPD, so cannot offer any informed opinion of that app.

All I can off is an opinion in general, when it comes to using third party applications to manage your Windows settings, installations, telemetry, etcetera.
  • I do not think I have ever seen one of these third party tools offer a single modification that you cannot do for yourself within the Windows environment. In my view people ought to invest time learning how to use Windows.
  • Generally speaking, most of these applications will make Registry modifications. While some are fine, in many cases the changes made are either:
    • Placed into the wrong Registry path and hive
    • Unnecessarily duplicated [ suggesting to me the person does not understand hierarchy at all ]
    • Deprecated! [ i.e. The tweak has become redundant because Microsoft has already modified the System to reject that tweak, or because the item being modified, is not located in an entirely different location in Windows, or renamed ].
  • I get people fair Big Brother seeing all they do, or hearing all they say. As a result people appear to want to block Telemetry in the Windows environment. The problem with the methods other applications use, is that they can result in Windows servers misidentifying your Windows edition, and that can result in the User not being offered Critical updates, that thus, can prevent the users computer functioning at optimum, but can also compromise its security altogether. Again, this over the years is almost certainly because of - a now well publicised - Registry tweak. Yes the tweak will halt some telemetry, but at the risk of what I allude to. Whether or not, WPD does this too I cannot confirm, as I have not tested it.

My biggest concern with these kind of tools, is it makes the User lazy! It's easy to make some tweaks and completely forget about them. After all, life is far to busy to be bothered managing your Windows OS as it was designed to be - isn't it!?

So the latest Windows update arrives, and guess what, a large part of the changes you made need to be done again. But will the lazy User even think about that, or will they just continue using their computer assuming all is as they set it up last month?

What if they do think to run their tool again? Will those same changes they used last month still work, or are there now some subtle changes in their new Windows 10 update that will either nullify their modifications, or worse, turn their modifications into a ticking time bomb that will cause them some serious grief with system crashes, application failures, or Security flaws that lead them into the dark world of being infected by some scum bags virus!

My advice - for what its worth - Make the time to learn about your operating system, and how it works. Learn how to using the tools Microsoft provide to modify your settings. If you currently using a Windows 10 Home edition and want to make the most of these tools, be aware you may need to be willing to spend some money, and purchase a Windows 10 Professional edition. I think that type of investment is well worth the cost; but as I said - this is my opinion.

Regards,

Regedit32
Thank you
 

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