When Commputer A connected to Computer B file write permissions denied


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I have two Windows 10 computers networked together as a private network. Both are on the network. I am connecting with the same account name and password on both computers. I get access going from A to B or from B to A. However when I go from B to A I get all the file permissions that account has on A. I have read/write permissions. But, when I go from A to B, I only have read permissions on B. I do not use Homegroup or domains.

I found a work around. If I give Everyone permission on the folders in B, I can write from A. But, I would prefer to have the same restrictions as I have when I log in on computer B.

I am working with a wired Ethernet.
 
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Trouble

Noob Whisperer
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Are both computers "Pro", "Home" or a combination?
AND if "a combination" which one is which.

It seems that when you have to resort to the "Everyone" workaround it usually involves the Home version, which just doesn't seem to be as robust when it comes to typical networking scenarios
 
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I have two Windows 10 computers networked together as a private network. Both are on the network. I am connecting with the same account name and password on both computers. I get access going from A to B or from B to A. However when I go from B to A I get all the file permissions that account has on A. I have read/write permissions. But, when I go from A to B, I only have read permissions on B. I do not use Homegroup or domains.

I found a work around. If I give Everyone permission on the folders in B, I can write from A. But, I would prefer to have the same restrictions as I have when I log in on computer B.

I am working with a wired Ethernet.
Thank you. I have seen these, and I checked them out again. I have done all these things.
 
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Are both computers "Pro", "Home" or a combination?
AND if "a combination" which one is which.

It seems that when you have to resort to the "Everyone" workaround it usually involves the Home version, which just doesn't seem to be as robust when it comes to typical networking scenarios
Well, Computer be was a home computer when I first ran into the problem. I purchased Win 10 Pro, and installed it, because I thought that might be the problem. But the problem persists. So far as I can tell, they are both set up the same but I wonder if that had something to do with the issue. I can connect, but I cannot write on B from A. If I go to B, of course, I have no problems on B, but what is wierd is that I can then connect to A, and it works. Unfortunately, A is my office, and I want to write on B.
 

Trouble

Noob Whisperer
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Well..... everything else being equal, it's probably going to come down to group memberships.
Right click the start button and select Run from the context menu and type
lusrmgr.msc into the run dialog text box and click ok or hit enter.
Select Users in the left column
Double click the common account you're using and in the account properties dialog box select the "Member Of" tab

That should show the groups the account is a member of.
I pretty much remove everything there except "Administrators"

Do that on both to confirm that, that account is solely a member of the local "Administrators Group" on both computers.
You'll likely need to reboot and log back in so that your access key (token) is updated.

Remember that when it comes to "Permissions" under sharing tab granting Full Control to the Everyone Group is perfectly acceptable and generally a best practice.

You perform granular access, using NTFS permissions under the security tab and that's where the most restrictive permission wins the war.

So if your account is a member of a group that has full permissions and also a member of a second group that has read permissions....
That account has READ permissions.

Capture.PNG
 
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Problem is, the account is an administrative account on both computers, and should have full control in permissions, since administative acccounts are listed with full control. I kind of concluded that if i have to have permission to get to the account on B, then everyone is ok. But it sure does puzzle me that i can go the other way, B to A and have no issues.
 

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